Family & Cosmetic Dental Care in a Relaxed Environment.

Exceptional Dentistry Las Vegas and Henderson NV Since 1999.

Dental Implants, Teeth Whitening, Porcelain Veneers, &
Botox Cosmetic.

Call Today For Consultation!

Email Us
Directions


With the advancement of modern cosmetic dentistry into all porcelain crowns from traditional porcelain fused to metal crowns (PFM crowns), many have wondered if the

Porcelain Crowns Marielaina Perrone DDS

The Natural Look of Porcelain Crowns

porcelain crowns would be as durable over the long term. Well, recent clinical studies have shown that they are just as strong and also have the ability to maintain their beauty over time as well.

The main differences in porcelain crowns are the type of porcelain used, and how they are fabricated in a dental laboratory. Different porcelain types and strengths are used for different reasons. Remember also, that a lab created porcelain crown, is of higher fabrication quality and fit, than an in office computer milled crown.

Long Term Study – Porcelain Crowns

The researchers at the Medical University at Innsbruck studied a little over 1,300 all porcelain crowns placed between 1987 and 2009. They were tested for predictability and strength and found to have a high,(93.5% probability of survival) success over a 10 year period. The study was published in the International Journal of Prosthodontics). The study included those with root canal teeth, and those who grind their teeth.

A total of 302 patients (120 men and 182 women) participated in the study. They were examined at the university during regularly scheduled visits for dental examination. Patient-specific data about sex, age, tooth sensitivity, smoking, and grinding  were noted, as well as self-reported data regarding their level of

Cosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDS

satisfaction with their restorations: excellent, good, medium, or none. The porcelain crowns were broken down into areas of mouth as well, into front( anterior), and back( premolar, and molar) regions.
All 1,335 porcelain crowns had been placed at the university between November 1987 and December 2009. Of these porcelain crowns, 451 were observed over a 10-year period, 84 for 15 years, and 24 over 20 years.

Dental examinations were completed by two dentists in the spring of 2010. One dentist had placed the majority of porcelain crowns, whereas the other dentist involved in examinations had placed none of them. California Dental Association/Ryge criteria were used to rate each porcelain crowns as a success, relative failure, or absolute failure.

Any porcelain crowns that had severe enough issues to warrant replacement were considered an absolute failure. If a finishing procedure or polishing was able to fix the issue, the porcelain crown was labeled a relative failure.

Of the 1,300+ porcelain crowns in the study, only 95 porcelain crowns were rated as failures, 79% of which were absolute failure. Most failures occurred in the anterior region, with 65, while 19 occurred in premolars and 11 occurred in molars.

Success rates remained strong over time. The estimated survival rate was 97.3% at five years, 96% at eight years, 94% at 10 years, 85.8% at 15 years, and 78.5% after 20

Porcelain Crowns Marielaina Perrone DDS

The Beauty Of Porcelain Crowns

years. Almost half of all porcelain crown failures happened in the first 8 years..

The most frequent reason for failure was fracture,(cracks) of the ceramic, according to the researchers, followed in order by cracks in the ceramic and decay.

Root canal teeth and patients who grind their teeth, had higher failure rates.

Patient responses to questions about satisfaction were very positive. With 96% rating it as excellent and 4% rating it as good. The surprising thing about this study was that even patients with failures thought that porcelain crowns were an ideal dental restoration and would do it all over again.

Porcelain Crowns Conclusion

Porcelain crowns are a proven part of cosmetic dentistry and with continued advances in dental porcelain (like e.max porcelain crowns) these results will be even better into the future. Porcelain crowns are an ideal restoration due to their color, shape, and light reflecting properties. The study just proves that they are a valuable asset to any dental patient’s smile.

We all have habits some good and some bad. But did you know that some of these habits can affect your teeth?

The following are some habits that can damage your teeth and oral health…

1. Tobacco. This is an obvious one for most people. Smoking turns your beautiful white teeth yellow over time, but it can be much more damaging than that. Smoking or even smokeless tobacco has been shown to cause oral cancer (along with lung and throat cancer), periodontal disease, tooth decay, and eventually tooth loss.

2. Diet pills. Taking these may seem like a quick way to slim your waist line, diet pills can also be an easy way to develop gum disease and tooth decay. Most people do not realize but many over the counter medications, like diet pills, actually cause your body to decrease salivary flow. When salivary flow decreases you increase your risk for tooth decay and periodontal disease. The best prescription for losing weight is a well balanced diet along with regular exercise. Not only will you lose weight but you will protect your smile.

3. Teeth grindingTeeth grinding (also called Bruxism) has a wide range of effects on a person’s smile. Grinding your teeth can affect your temperomandibular joint (commonly referred to as the TMJ), cause premature breakdown of teeth, cause tooth sensitivity, and even change the appearance of your face. People who have normally healthy teeth will over time destroy the outer layer of their teeth(the enamel) which causes chipping, fractures, and sensitivity. Stress is a major factor in teeth grinding so finding ways to relax prior to bedtime will be the long term goal. Your dentist can fabricate a custom night guard for you to protect your teeth and help stop the habit.

4. Choosing not to Floss. Brushing and flossing are equally important. Many people use the excuse that they are really good brushers so they do not need to floss. But that is not the case. Flossing at least once per day is one of the best things you can do for maintenance of your teeth. Flossing helps remove plaque and food debris from around the teeth, in between the teeth and along the gum line. This will help prevent the onset of periodontal disease. Flossing will also help control bad breath by removing the bacteria and food debris causing it in most cases.

5. Brushing at the wrong time. We have always been taught to brush after every meal. But recent studies have shown that depending on what you are consuming it might no be the best idea for you. After eating or drinking foods high in acid (like soft drinks, citrus fruits, or even wine) it is best to rinse with water first to neutralize the acids and then brush about an hour or so later. Researchers have shown this is because right after exposing our teeth to the high acid environment the enamel weakens and the brushing action could cause tooth enamel erosion. So its best to rinse first to neutralize the acid and then brush later.

6. Chewing Ice. This is especially dangerous for your molars in the back of your mouth. Chewing on ice presents an advanced challenge to our teeth. The tremendous forces needed to break thru the ice can crack your teeth or existing fillings. Our molars have pointy edges called cusps and can shear off and break from chewing ice. The coldness of ice can cause the nerves connected to the teeth to get damaged as well. An alternative to crushing the ice with your teeth and let the ice cube melt in your mouth.

7. Sports drinks. These types of drinks have become extremely popular among athletes as well as the general population. But they are hazardous to your teeth. Sports drinks are highly acidic just like soft drinks. This means they can have the same effect as soft drinks in eroding away a tooth’s enamel. Also many of these drinks are high in sugar content which can lead to increased risk for tooth decay.

8. Nail Biting. This is the most commonly found bad habit in children and even adults. When thinking, during stressed times, people tend to put their nails under their teeth

teeth damaged by bad habits

Bad habits Damaging your teeth?

and bite on them continuously. This is an unhygienic habit as all the dirt from the nails will enter your mouth. When you bite on your nails this dirt enters your mouth with your saliva. Also your teeth tend to chip and break when you bite your nails often.

9. White wine. Many people enjoy a glass of wine from time to time whether just relaxing at the end of a long day or with dinner. Most know that red wine can cause staining on teeth so many of us drink white wine. White wine can be just as damaging but in a different way. White wine is extremely acidic and can cause permanent damage to your teeth thru enamel erosion. A good tip is following drinking a glass of white wine rinse out your mouth with water to neutralize and cleanse the acids away. 

 10. Skipping Regular Dental Exams and Cleanings. Even if you brush and floss as recommended, dental plaque and calculus can build up on surface tooth enamel and below the gum line. Periodic dental exams and professional cleanings every 6 months can greatly lower your risk of tooth decay, tooth loss and periodontal disease.



Tooth decay (also called dental cavities) is the destruction of tooth structure. It can affect both the enamel (outer layer) and the dentin layer (inner layer) of the tooth. Tooth decay is the most common cause of loss of teeth and it affects almost everyone at some point in their lives. Tooth decay is also the second most common disease in the U.S. (the common cold is first).  Luckily, cavities can be easily prevented.

It is normal for bacteria to be present in the mouth. Certain types of bacteria are able to attach to hard surfaces in the mouth like the enamel that cover the teeth. If these bacteria are not removed, they are able to multiply and grow in number until a colony forms. Proteins that are present in the saliva also mix in and the bacteria colony becomes a whitish film (plaque) on the enamel.

These bacteria feed on sugars and starches from the food like chocolates, sticky sweets, ice cream, milk, cakes, and even fruits, vegetables and juices, producing acid as a byproduct. This acid then erodes the tooth enamel slowly dissolving the tooth. A cavity is formed causing a hole or break in the tooth structure. If not fixed at this stage, the tooth decay can progress further reaching the dentin where it can spread even quicker. The cavity can progress very quickly after entering the dentin. This can lead to a larger issue of a dental abscess if untreated.

Unfortunately for the patient, this process moves very slowly so there may not be any pain or tooth sensitivity until the cavity becomes quite big.

Preventing Tooth Decay

-Maintain a regimen of Dental Hygiene. This is a necessity to prevent tooth decay. A good dental hygiene program includes regular visits to dentist and hygienist, brushing after every meal (with a fluoride containing toothpaste), and flossing at least once a day. You should especially remember to brush before bed. Food can get stuck in between our teeth when we eat. If the food particles are not removed, it can lead to tooth decay. Flossing at least once a day is the best way to remove food from in between the teeth.

-Eat well balanced nutritious meal and limit snacking. Stay away from carbohydrates such as candy, pretzels and chips. These can remain on the tooth surface. If sticky foods are eaten, brush your teeth soon afterwards. Eating fruits and vegetables for snacks and limiting the amount of sugary drinks and foods will help to prevent plaque from forming on the teeth.

-Supplemental Fluoride. Fluoride can strengthen your teeth. Your dentist may recommend a daily fluoride rinse (ACT anticavity rinse is an example) as part of your dental hygiene. This will help in cavity prevention.

Fluoride Rinse - ACT

Prevent Tooth Decay – ACT Fluoride Rinse

regimen.

-Dental Sealants. These can prevent some tooth decay. Sealants are ultra thin coatings applied to the top (chewing) surfaces of the molars. This coating helps prevent the build up of plaque in the deep grooves on these molars. Sealants are generally applied on the children’s teeth soon after the molars erupt into the mouth. Adults can also benefit from the use of sealants if they have a high risk for decay or have deep grooves in the molars and premolars.

-Antiseptic Mouth Rinse. There are several antiseptic mouth rinses on the market that have been clinically proven to reduce plaque. These include Listerine or Crest Pro Health. Rinsing with either of these mouth rinses after brushing or eating can help in cavity prevention. They work by reducing the number of bacteria present in mouth as well as acting as a rinse to wash away plaque and film on teeth.

-Sugarless Gum. Chewing sugarless gum will help prevent tooth decay by stimulating salivary flow. In studies xylitol has shown to temporarily slow down the growth of bacteria that causes tooth decay. There are several brands of xylitol gum including epic, wrigley’s, and trident.

To reduce tooth decay, eating less sugar, regular cleaning and flossing are all needed to keep the bacteria that causes tooth decay from getting out of control. Tooth decay is preventable and treatable in most stages. Diligent dental hygiene along with regular dental visits will keep you cavity free!

tooth decay prevention

 

 



Maintaining good oral hygiene is essential for healthy teeth and gums, but did you know that the kind of foods you eat can also help (or hurt) your oral health? Eating foods that are good for your teeth and being careful about those that are not is a key component to maintaining healthy teeth and gums.

Diet plays a very large role in the maintenance of our oral health and prevention of cavities. Changes can occur in your oral cavity as soon as you eat certain food or drinks. Bacteria in the mouth convert the sugars in the food we eat into acids. The acids are what start to attack the enamel on teeth, beginning the decay process. The more often we eat and snack, the more frequently we are exposing our teeth to the cycle of decay. A tooth’s biggest nemesis is acid, either directly contained in the food and drink, or produced by bacteria that thrive on sugar and convert it to acid. The mouth’s best friends are foods that are able to neutralize the acids, providing minerals and vitamins to allow for repair of tooth enamel and stimulate salivary flow.

How we eat is also just as important. In a recent study, researchers looked at more than 1,000 people (both male and female) between the ages of 18 and 30 for links between diet and tooth decay. They found that eating high-acid foods (such as fruits and their juices) throughout the day can harm a person’s teeth if no effort is made to counteract the effects (i.e. brushing, rinsing, and flossing).

Enamel is your teeth’s first defense against tooth decay. If the enamel on your teeth begins to erode or is damaged, you’re at an increased risk for tooth sensitivity and cavities. You can help strengthen your tooth enamel by eating foods high in calcium. Also, adding foods rich in vitamin D to your diet will allow you to better absorb the calcium that healthy teeth need.

Best Foods For Your Dental Health

Foods For Good Dental Health1) Calcium. Low-fat or fat-free dairy products without added sugar such as milk, cheese, and plain yogurt are calcium staples that don’t add unhealthy saturated fat to your diet. Hard cheese in particular also helps neutralize the acids found in foods that threaten tooth enamel. Also, cheese helps stimulate salivary flow, while its calcium helps replace vitamins and minerals leached from the teeth. Other good sources of calcium are green leafy vegetables like kale, bok choy, and even Brussels sprouts, which deliver a healthy boost of vitamin C, too.

2) Vitamin D. Egg yolks, mushrooms, and most fish are excellent sources of the vitamin D you need to absorb calcium, which builds and maintains healthy teeth.

3) Vitamin C. Red peppers and sweet potatoes can provide the vitamin C necessary for healthy gums. Citrus fruits like oranges are also high in vitamin C, but you have to be careful of their acidity.

4) High-fiber foods. Work like a detergent in the mouth, not only physically scrubbing the teeth, but also increasing salivary flow by requiring longer chewing times. Saliva is the mouth’s first line of defense against tooth decay, because it neutralizes acids that can damage teeth, and contains calcium and phosphates that help rebuild minerals leached away by bacterial acids. Juicy fruits and vegetables (Apples, pears, celery, and carrots are all good choices) also have a high water concentration that helps counteract their sugar content. High-fiber foods also lay a good foundation to the building of an overall healthy diet, so they are doubly beneficial. However, even a healthy food like an apple can expose teeth to damaging acid when eaten slowly. To reduce the impact of acid, brush your teeth before eating and drink water or rinse immediately after.

5)  Water. Water is indispensable when it comes to oral health. It’s the main component of saliva, and is important for both tooth and gum health. Water is valuable as the final rinsing agent for foods and sugary drinks. If the water is also fluoridated, it adds a secondary element in that it will strengthen the tooth enamel.

6) Xylitol. Sugar free gums of any kind can be very beneficial to dental health, because they stimulate salivary production and can help physically scrub your teeth while chewing. But Gum with Xylitolthose sweetened with xylitol (a type of sugar extracted from certain types of plants) can actually battle tooth decay. This occurs because xylitol works against mutans streptococci, the bacteria that causes tooth decay. Xylitol is available as a main ingredient for gums like Wrigley’s, Trident, or Epic brands.

7) Green and Black Teas. These contain poly phenols that interact with the bacteria that causes plaque. These poly phenols can kill or suppress bacteria, preventing them from growing or producing acid. The poly phenols in coffee also have cavity-fighting properties. Studies have also shown cocoa to have strong anti-mutans streptococci properties, although eating sugary chocolate bars is not very tooth friendly.

8) Nuts. Many nuts provide vitamins and minerals that help your teeth. These can include peanuts (vitamin D and calcium), almonds (high levels of calcium), cashews (increases salivary flow and helps clean teeth) and walnuts (fiber, folic acid, iron, thiamine, magnesium, iron, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin B6, potassium and zinc).

The Worst Foods for your Dental Health

1) Carbonated Sugary Soft Drinks. These types of drinks add so much sugar to our diets. The sugar content is bad for general body health as well as our teeth and gums. But teeth aren’t safe even for those who stick to diet drinks. Artificially sweetened soft drinks contain similar tooth eroding acids, such as phosphoric and citric. Even canned iced teas, which normally might be good for teeth, contain flavor-enhancing organic acids that can erode tooth enamel.

2)  Sport and Health Drinks. Advertised health drinks are filled with dangers for your teeth. Sports drinks are acidic and full of sugar. And vitamin waters can contain as much sugar as a regular size candy bar. Chewable vitamins are especially bad, because they contain concentrated acids that tend to stick to and between teeth.

Bad foods for teeth3)  Sticky Sweets. It is certainly not news that caramels and other gummy, sugary sweets are bad for teeth. It’s not just the sugar itself,  it is how long the teeth are exposed to that sugar. So while those caramels stick and cling tenaciously to tooth surfaces and crevices, hard candies and lollipops are also very bad. Ideally if you are to consume sugary sweets, you should brush and rinse right after eating them.

4) Dried fruits. Fresh grapes and plums are considered to be quite nutritious and good for you but if they are dried they are no longer considered as such. Although often advertised as healthy snacks, dried fruits like raisins, prunes and apricots, are very similar to caramels. Already sweet when fresh, their sugars are highly concentrated as the water is dried away, and their gummy texture can cling to teeth as much as gooey caramels. Even worse, the fruit is packed with non soluble cellulose fiber, which can bind and trap sugars on and around the tooth. This ends upm making it potentially worse than candies.

6) Carbohydrates. Many white starches, like white bread, white sugar, white rice, and French Fries can easily become lodged between teeth and in crevices of the teeth. These foods will not taste sweet on their own but the starches can begin converting to sugar very quickly. This occurs not only from the bacteria, but also by the by the enzymes in the saliva as part of the digestive process. Try brown rices and whole wheat pastas instead. these do not begin to break down until they get to your stomach.

7) Drinks and Foods High in Acid. Citrus fruits and drinks contain powerful citric acid. While oranges, lemons and grapefruit can be a healthy part of the diet, they should be consumed quickly, preferably as part of a meal, and the teeth should be rinsed well afterwards. Sucking on citrus fruits should be avoided. There is a common home remedy working its way around the internet using lemon wedges for at home DIY tooth whitening. This is not a smart remedy.

It can be very difficult to give up a food that you desire, but you do not have to stop eating sugary and acidic foods altogether. Most dentists would agree that any food can cause plaque which in turn will make you more susceptible to decay. Maintaining proper oral hygiene is key.

Here are a few tips if you crave something sugary or acidic:

-Moderation is the key. Enjoy it but do not go overboard.

-Eat it with different kinds of foods to help neutralize the acid before it does damage to your teeth and gums.

-Drink water to rinse away bacteria and any food particles that remain in the mouth.

It is also important to brush and rinse after eating. It is recommended though to wait 30 minutes to an hour after you have an acidic food or beverage because the acid weakens your tooth enamel, making your teeth more susceptible to damage from brushing. Another option is to chew a piece of sugar-free gum for 20 minutes to neutralize saliva and to reduce plaque buildup. Following these tips (along with regular dental visits) will help keep your teeth healthy for years to come.

Best (and Worst) Foods for Best Dental Health
5.0 out of 5.0
based on 62 reviews