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Root canal and pain go hand in hand in many people’s minds. Generally our fears and anxiety stem from others telling us their experiences and not from our own. A root canal (also referred to as RCT or root canal therapy) is a dental procedure where the damaged nerve (also called the pulp) of a tooth is removed. Following removal of the nerve, the canals of the tooth are cleaned and sterilized. Following this cleaning process the canals are filled and sealed permanently to avoid future dental infection. If treatment is not undertaken, the dental infection will affect the tooth along with surrounding oral structures (like gums and bone tissues) and a dental abscess can form in the area as the infection looks to escape.

The reason for the removal of the tooth’s nerve is because these nerves (along with associated blood vessels) is responsible with providing hydration and nutrients to our teeth. They also give us the ability to sense hot and cold.

Surveys over the years find that root canal therapy is considered the most feared of all dental procedures. These surveys also found people’s views on root canal therapy is based on what others have told them and not their own individual experiences. This leads to people believing mostly inaccurate stories about root canals. It is the fear of the unknown as I like to call it.

Root Canal Therapy Marielaina Perrone DDS
Root Canal Therapy Can Save Your Smile!

Myths Surrounding Root Canal Therapy

Myth #1 – Root Canal Therapy Is Painful

Root canal therapy does not directly cause pain, this therapy is designed to relieve it! With modern anesthetics, techniques, and technology, root canal therapy is no more painful than getting a simple filling. The major cause of root canal therapy pain is the infection that a patient may present with. An infected site will cause extreme pain that can be difficult to get under control initially.

Your dentist will make sure you are comfortably anesthetized and relaxed prior to beginning root canal therapy. The removal of the pain-causing infected pulp from your tooth will relieve any pressure that is built up causing some of that discomfort. After the infected tissues are cleaned out, your tooth will be sealed closed to keep out any further invading bacteria and repair the enamel of the tooth with a dental filling or a protective dental crown.

Myth #2 – Why Not Just Remove The Tooth?

A well trained dentist will always use tooth extraction as a “last resort” type dental treatment. Nothing functions as well as your own natural teeth, so tooth preservation whenever possible is always the best course of treatment. Root canal therapy allows you to keep your natural tooth. This prevents you from having to resort to other extensive dental treatments, such as dental bridges or dental implants, to help replace the lost tooth and restore your smile.

Myth #3 – Root Canal Therapy Is Only For Teeth Causing Pain

Sometimes a dental infection has become so severe that the tooth actually dies. You may no longer be feeling any pain but infection is still present and damaging your underlying bone structure. A lot of the pain and discomfort we feel when dental infection is present is pressure. A dental infection can sometimes cause a bump in the gum tissue where the infection can leak out relieving that pressure and allowing it to feel better even though it is not. Even at this point, root canal therapy can still save the tooth structure itself. This is one of the reasons for routine dental examinations and radiographs. These visits can let us see changes as they happen before they become bigger issues. Regular visits will actually save you money over the long haul but sometimes that is hard to understand.

Root Canal Therapy Marielaina Perrone DDS
Painless Root Canal Therapy Is Possible

Myth #4 – Root Canal Therapy Takes A Long Time

Most root canal therapy treatment can be completed in 1-2 visits. If there is no active, serious dental infection present they can sometimes be finished in just one appointment or you may have to return to complete the filling or crown procedure. The condition of your tooth following root canal therapy and the severity of infection dictate the treatment time needed. Sometimes a dental crown is not needed but is usually recommended as the tooth will become more brittle without the natural nutrients and blood flowing thru the tooth.

Myth #5 – Dental Infections Are Common Following Root Canal Therapy

A re infection of the tooth root can happen, but it is not very common. If dental infection returns to the tooth, further dental treatment will be needed. The newest dental materials and technques used to fill a tooth following root canal therapy have been specifically designed to significantly reduce the likelihood of developing another dental infection in that tooth.

Root Canal Therapy Myths Conclusion

Root canal therapy has developed a very bad reputation over the years. Rest assured with new techniques it can be a painless experience. If you are feeling dental anxiety speak to your dentist and they can offer you advice on how to best cope.

Dry socket (also called medically as alveolar osteitis) is a very painful dental condition that can sometimes happen following removal of a permanent adult tooth. Dry socket occurs when the blood clot at the area of tooth removal fails to develop, or it dislodges or dissolves before the wound has fully healed. Having a tooth removed by your dentist comes with certain expectations. This includes discomfort following the tooth removal. However, this discomfort should last a day or 2 at the most and be fairly mild. Dry socket pain can become very intense quickly and last for almost a week in some cases. Dry socket is actually the most common complication of a tooth extraction. Even with that fact it still only occurs a little less than 2% of the time (about 200,000 cases in US each year) and most often following removal of wisdom teeth. It is also prevalent in those with poor blood flow, smokers, and diabetics. Dry socket generally occurs 2-3 days following tooth removal procedure.

When a tooth is removed, a blood clot forms to protect the opening in your gums as it heals. If the blood clot does not form properly or becomes dislodged, it can create a dry socket. A dry socket leaves the nerves and underlying bones exposed, so it is important to see your dentist immediately. If left untreated, this can lead to dental infection and other complications. Dry socket most often occurs in those  who smoke, are on oral contraceptives (estrogen can interfere with clotting mechanisms), or do not follow post care instructions properly.  Interesting for women, the oral contraceptives also tend to lower pain tolerance which will lead to increased pain sensation if dry socket occurs.

What Is A Dry Socket? Symptoms

Dry Socket Las Vegas Marielaina Perrone DDSSigns and symptoms of dry socket may include:

-Sharp, aching pain usually starting 2-3 days after removal of a tooth or teeth

-Blood Clot Missing. If you peek into your mouth you would see an opening where tooth was and if there is no blood clot present then you probably have a dry socket. In a normal situation a blood clot forms and covers the exposed opening.

-Visible Bone Present. Bone that can be seen upon visual examination in the socket.

-Radiating Pain. Radiating from the tooth socket to your ear, eye, temple or neck on the same side of your face as the tooth removal.

-Abnormally bad breath or a foul odor emanating from your mouth. This will include having a bad taste in your mouth as well.

-Swollen Lymph Nodes. If you have swollen lymph nodes around your jaw or neck, this is a sign of dental infection and you need to be seen by your dentist immediately as this can be a serious medical emergency if untreated. Signs of a dental infection can include fever, swelling, redness, and pus discharge from extraction site.

-Over The Counter Pain Medications Do Not Work. Generally, tylenol, aleve and advil will not be strong enough of a pain reliever to be able to control dry socket pain.

How Can A Dry Socket Be Treated?

Your dentist will relieve the area of pain using a local anesthetic. If the infection has spread this may not relieve all pain and discomfort at this time but it will help. Your dentist will need to inspect the tooth removal site and clean it of any debris or food particles. Once the area is cleaned sufficiently, your dentist will probably place a medicated dressing over the area to promote healing and soothe the dry socket symptoms. These medicated dressings usually need to be changed daily until dry socket symptoms subside. Use of a warm cloth on outside of face can also aid in healing by promoting increased blood flow to the area. If there is infection present or your dentist suspects one is forming an antibiotic may be prescribed. You will also be given detailed instructions on at home care. Usually includes rinsing with warm, salt water and just being careful with area while it heals. Healing of a dry socket at this point will take between 1 and 2 weeks.

Possible Home Help Remedies For Dry Socket

Home remedies to help with dry socket pain can include:
-Rinsing with Warm salt water. Rinsing can help eliminate bacteria and reduce or prevent further infection.
-Cold and heat therapy. This can promote blood flow to area of dry socket. For the first 24 hours or so following a tooth extraction, use cold against your face for 15 minutes at a time to reduce swelling. After 1st day you can use heat in the form of warm cloth to help manage pain.
-Clove oil. This contains eugenol (this is traditional dental office smell), which has anesthetic, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. It can help to soothe pain and help prevent infections. Some people have reactions to clove oil so speak to your dentist before using. You can place clove oil on a sterile gauze and place it over dry socket area for 15 minutes or so to help relieve dry socket symptoms.
-Honey. Honey has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Clinical studies have found that honey when used for dry socket applications resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation, swelling, pain, and discomfort. There was also evidence honey possibly prevents further dental infection. Honey can be applied similar to the clove oil. Place a small amount of honey on a sterile gauze and place over dry socket wound.
-Black tea. Contains tannic acid. Tannic acid can act as a natural antibacterial agent while also having the ability to reduce both swelling and pain.
-Tea tree oil. Also has antiseptic, antibacterial, and analgesic properties.
-Oregano oil.  Has antibacterial benefits and studies have shown it may even be effective against some drug-resistant strains of bacteria.
-Chamomile tea. Chamomile has anti oxidant properties. This can promote wound healing.

What Is A Dry Socket? Conclusion

It is important to follow your dentist’s instructions especially following a tooth removal. Communicate concerns and questions immediately so they can be addressed immediately to avoid unforeseen complications. A dry socket can be quite painful and can have serious consequences if ignored. See your dentist regularly to maintain a healthy smile for a lifetime.



Are Dental Implants Safe? They have been a highly successful dental procedure offered by dentists around the world. As a matter of fact a well planned dental implant will have success rate over 98%. As dental implants technology has evolved materials and techniques have advanced as well. Below we will attempt to answer the question….Are Dental Implants Safe?

Are Dental Implants Safe? Benefits

EstheticsDental implants have the ability to give you a fuller, healthier smile you have always dreamed of.

Peace Of Mind. Living your life in fear of what you can and cannot eat is not a fun proposition. Dental implants can give you peace of mind that you can eat whatever you want and not worry about the social implications. Millions of patients have proven the answer is yes to the question are dental implants safe?

Improved Function. Big improvement in eating and speech. With missing teeth, eating and speaking can be quite a challenge. For those who enjoy eating or need to speak in front of others dental implants can give a huge boost.

Are Dental Implants Safe Henderson NV Marielaina Perrone DDSEliminate Health Issues. Clinical studies have shown a direct link between dental health and overall health. Dental implants can restore your mouth to a healthy state giving you an edge in maintaining overall health. Uncontrolled dental health can lead to the development and advancement of periodontal disease. This disease is quite progressive and if left untreated it can lead to cardiovascular disease (heart attacks and stroke), Alzheimer’s disease, and even diabetes. Once patients are ready for dental implants, their mouth must be in a healthy state. Dental implants will lead to better overall health.

Life Quality Improvement. Dental implants give you a natural looking smile and improve overall function. This is especially true for wearers of dentures. Dental implants will allow you to free yourself of the use of denture adhesives and relieve you of discomfort from ill fitting dentures.

Increased Self Esteem and Self Confidence. This includes being able to smile effortlessly without fear. Dental implants look and feel just like real teeth. You can laugh, smile, and just feel good about who you are and the way you look.

Are Dental Implants Safe? Risks

Dental Implants Fail To Integrate. When dental implants heal properly they integrate with the surrounding bone (this is called osseointegration). If osseointegration does not occur it will lead to dental implant failure. A well trained implant dentist will be able to evaluate and treatment plan properly to minimize the risks associated with dental implants. If a dental implant does not integrate as planned it can be removed. Once the area has healed another surgery can be attempted at a later date.

Surgical Infection. Of all the risks associated with dental implants this is the most common. This can occur from non sterile intruments, a dental implant that has been contaminated, decreased healing ability, or a pre existing infection being present. Dental implants are associated with a condition called Peri-Implantitis. This is an inflammation or swelling of the surrounding tissues where the dental implant was placed. If peri-implantitis is not treated properly and in a timely manner it can lead to implant failure and bone loss. These infections generally occur quickly after surgery but can in some rare intances occur months to years after surgery. Important to have your dental implants evaluated during routine dental examinations 2x per year.

Post Surgical Bleeding. Minimal bleeding following surgery is normal and is considered quite normal for about 1-2 days following surgery. Placing a gauze pad placed over the surgical area for 30 minutes should normally stop the bleeding. Bleeding beyond that time is not normal and you should notify your implant dentist immediately if you have concerns about your dental implants or the surgery.

Surrounding Tissue Damage. Placement of dental implants is a precise surgery. Surrounding areas can be damaged including adjacent teeth, sinus cavity, or nerves. Once again choose your implant dentist wisely. One with experience and proper training will minimize these risks. Even the most skilled implant dentist can have errors. However, the complications can be minimized as well as how they are handled if complications were to arise.

Allergies. Some patients have been known to have allergic reactions to titanium. If you know you are allergic to titanium let your dentist know during initial discussions.

-Dental Implant Corrosion. Titanium dental implants are designed to fight corrosion but it still can happen. If corrosion were to happen the dental implant likely would need to be removed. Your implant dentist will evaluate what comes next if this were to happen.

Are Dental Implants Safe? Bone Grafts

A bone graft is the replacement or addition to the bone around the teeth. Bone grafting is a term used to describe a variety of procedures used to add or build bone so that dental implants can be placed and give greater success long term.

A bone graft typically involves adding bone or bone like materials to the jaw. The bone graft can consist of your own bone (also called Autologous bone), synthetic bone, can be processed bone obtained from a cadaver (also called Allograft), or can even come from bovine/cow sources (these types are also called Xenografts). After grafting, you generally have to wait several months for the grafted material to fuse or become one with the existing bone structure.  Processed bone grafted materials either cause surrounding bone to grow into the graft or cause cells around the graft to change into bone. Autologous bone transplants bone cells or a block of bone that fuses to the jaw.

Dental bone grafts for the purpose of dental implants has a very high success rate. But there is always a possibility that the bone graft will not work as planned, even if your own bone was used. Bone grafts are not rejected by the body like organ transplants. There is still some mystery as to why some bone grafts fail. We do know that certain patients (example – smokers, diabetics, and patients with poor dental hygiene) have higher risks of graft failure.

A failed bone graft will need to be removed. Once the area has healed properly, you and your dentist may choose to place a second bone graft.

Are Dental Implants Safe? Diabetes

According to a clinical study by the Journal of the American Dental Association, dental implants have been found to be safe for diabetics.

The clinical study observed dental patients with uncontrolled diabetes who also had dental implants. Following one year, none of the dental implants were lost and they found zero connection between elevated blood sugar and dental implant complications.

This does not mean that if you are a diabetic, you will not experience dental implant complications. But having diabetes should not be a major concern for you or your dentist in regards to getting a dental implant.

Are Dental Implants Safe? Conclusion

Dental Implants have proven to safe with decades of dental use. The question should not be are dental implants safe? but are dental implants right for me? Ask your dentist 89014 today for a consultation to restore your smile!




Root canal and pain go hand in hand in many people’s minds. Generally our fears and anxiety stem from others telling us their experiences and not from our own. A root canal (also referred to as RCT or root canal therapy) is a dental procedure where the damaged nerve (also called the pulp) of a tooth is removed. Following removal of the nerve, the canals of the tooth are cleaned and sterilized. Following this cleaning process the canals are filled and sealed permanently to avoid future dental infection. If treatment is not undertaken, the dental infection will affect the tooth along with surrounding oral structures (like gums and bone tissues) and a dental abscess can form in the area as the infection looks to escape.

The reason for the removal of the tooth’s nerve is because these nerves (along with associated blood vessels) is responsible with providing hydration and nutrients to our teeth. They also give us the ability to sense hot and cold.

Surveys year after year find that root canal therapy is considered the most feared of all dental procedures. These surveys also found people’s views on root canal therapy is based on what others have told them and not their own individual experiences. This leads to people believing mostly inaccurate stories about root canals. It is the fear of the unknown as I like to call it.

Is Root Canal Painful Or Can It Be Painless?

A root canal is necessary when the nerve of a tooth develops inflammation or becomes infected. This inflammation or dental infection can develop in a number of different ways:

Tooth decay that pushes into the area of the nerve or pulp chamber.

Fracture or chip in the tooth that gives bacteria a pathway to spread into the tooth’s nerve canal.

Trauma. Traumatic injury to a tooth may cause pulp damage even if the tooth has no visible chips or cracks. If pulp inflammation or infection is left untreated, it can cause pain or lead to a dental abscess.

A tooth causing pain of this type is irreversible. To save the tooth a root canal must be performed.

Signs and symptoms that a root canal is probably necessary can include pain, extended sensitivity to temperature (either hot or cold or both), tenderness to touch and chewing, discoloration of the tooth, and swelling, drainage and tenderness in the lymph nodes, bone and surrounding gingival tissues. In some cases, no outward dental symptoms are present at all

A root canal usually requires one or more visits to the dentist and can be performed by either a general dentist or a specialist called an endodontist. An endodontist is a dentist who specializes in the causes, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and injuries of the human dental pulp or the nerve of the tooth. Your dentist will generally make the call on who should perform the root canal. You will be referred to endodontist if any of the following are needed:

-Degree Of Difficulty. Some teeth have anatomy that is slightly abnormal which makes the canals of the tooth harder to access.

-Re treatment of a previous root canal.

-Patient’s preference.

You and your dentist will discuss who is best suited to complete this root canal for you and make the best, informed decision for your dental treatment.

Root Canal Procedure

Is Root Canal Painful marielaina Perrone DDS Las vegasTake an X-ray if one has not already been taken. This will give your dentist a chance to evaluate the anatomy and shape of the tooth’s canals. It can also show the presence of a dental infection.

Anesthetic. Your dentist will use a local anesthetic to numb the surrounding areas to give you pain relief and also allow the procedure to be completed pain free. Some patients do not require any anesthetic but it will make it more comfortable.

Cleaning Of Tooth Canals. Tiny instruments are used to slowly clean out and debride bacteria, decayed nerve tissues, and bacteria from inside the tooth’s canals. Sterile water, peroxide, or sodium hypochlorite are used periodically to flush away the debris and kill any bacteria present.

Filling of Canals. Each canal is filled to the end of the tooth with a rubbery compound called gutta percha and permanently sealed. The process essentially is like a cork to prevent bacteria and fluid from re-entering the tooth, and keep it sterile. Many dentists prefer to wait a week or so before sealing the tooth. This will give the inflammation that has developed a chance to decrease back to normal levels. Others prefer to seal the tooth the same day it is cleaned out. If the root canal is not completed on the same day, a temporary filling is placed to keep out contaminants like saliva and food until the next appointment.

Following treatment, your tooth may feel sensitive for a few days to a week. This is especially true if there was pain or dental infection before the procedure. This discomfort can be relieved with over the counter or prescription pain medications or an antibiotic may be necessary if an infection was present. Follow directions given to you very carefully and feel free to ask your dentist questions if an issue comes up.

Your tooth may continue to feel slightly different from your other teeth for some time after your root canal treatment is completed. However, if you have severe pain or pressure or pain that lasts more than a few days, call your dentist immediately.

Restoration of Tooth. Generally but not always a tooth that needs a root canal often is one that already has a large dental restoration or extensive tooth decay. Even when tooth decay was not a factor, the tooth treated with a root canal is weaker than a “live” tooth. Therefore, a crown, crown and post, or other extensive dental restoration often needs to be placed on the tooth to protect it, prevent it from breaking, and restore it back to full function again. After a completed dental restoration, you will not be able to notice any difference in its function or form or feel. You and your dentist will discuss this need further and make an informed decision together the best course of action for your dental care.

Is A Root Canal Painful Conclusion

A dental root canal is extremely successful with a more than a 95% rate of success. Many teeth with a completed root canal can last a lifetime with no issues.

Most root canals are completed to relieve the pain of toothaches caused by pulpal inflammation or dental infection. With modern advancements in techniques, dental materials, and anesthetics, most patients state that they do not feel any pain once the procedure is underway. Root canal procedures have an undue reputation of being painful. Usually most patients report that the procedure itself is no more painful than having a routine dental restoration placed. The misconception has developed because the majority of the pain stems from the dental infection and pulpal inflammation that has developed. This can be tricky to get good anesthesia but a good dentist will be able to make you comfortable during the procedure.

As noted above, the pain from root canals in modern dentistry is mainly from the dental infection that presents to the dentist and the actual procedure should be pain and worry free. The best defense against developing a toothache and the need for a root canal is to see your dentist regularly, maintain proper oral hygiene, and call your dentist at the earliest signs if you have any pains or discomfort.