Family & Cosmetic Dental Care in a Relaxed Environment.

Exceptional Dentistry Las Vegas and Henderson NV Since 1999.

Dental Implants, Teeth Whitening, Porcelain Veneers, &
Botox Cosmetic.

Call Today For Consultation!

Email Us
Directions



Dental implants have altered the face of dentistry over the last 20 years for patients and dentists alike. They have been nothing less than a miracle in the replacement of lost teeth whether it be a single tooth, multiple teeth, or as an anchor for a denture. As the technology has matured, new dental technology advancements and techniques have been developed. One of those newer dental techniques includes All On 4 Dental Implants. This procedure allows for the placement of four dental implants (hence the name all on 4 dental implants), and the restoration to be placed on the same day. Patients leave the office with teeth on same day as dental implant surgery. For this reason all on 4 dental implants are also called “new teeth in a day“.

Who Wants All On 4 Dental Implants?

The patients who choose all on four dental implants, they do so for many reasons including, poor fitting existing dentures, terrible trauma causing tooth loss, tooth decay or periodontal disease causing progressive tooth loss. The most common patients to choose all on four, are not necessarily denture wearers. They are patients who have been fighting an uphill battle for a while and know that they are losing their teeth. These individuals have been trying to hold on as long as possible because they do not want to have any time in their life without teeth, and the thought of a removable denture is not an option…..in comes the all on 4 dental implants system to save their smile.

What are All On 4 Dental Implants?

The All on 4 Dental Implants procedure was developed in the middle of the 1990’s. The all on 4 dental implants system has allowed for a variety of patients who, for various reasons, were not considered good candidates for traditional dental implants to now become candidates for dental implants.

The All on 4 Dental Implants procedure uses four dental implants per arch (either upper or lower or can be done on both).  The dental implants in the back are placed on an angle to take maximum advantage of the existing bone structure. Special dental implants were developed and refined that could support the immediate fitting of replacement teeth. This treatment is attractive to those with loose dentures or those in need of full upper and/or lower restorations. With the All-on-4 dental implants procedure, qualified patients receive just four dental implants and a full set of new upper or lower replacement teeth in just one appointment. This usually able to be done without the need for dental bone grafts.  The real attraction to the all on 4 dental implants procedure is how quickly permanent dental implants can be placed. This allows patients the ability to leave the same day with a denture that is fixed in place and stabilized by the dental implants.

Traditionally, the  approach to restoring a full arch of teeth (either upper or lower) usually involved dental bone grafts, six or more dental implants, and as much as 18 months of treatment. In that time, the patient would be wearing an interim denture while the dental bone grafts and dental implants heal and integrate into the bone. This can be very expensive, time consuming, and uncomfortable for a patient to continuously go back for treatment.

What Appointments are Needed for All On 4 Dental Implants?

The All on 4 Dental Implants procedure generally consists of the following visits:

Initial Visit(s) – The initial visit(s) for the all on 4 dental implants procedure is necessary for the dentist to do a proper treatment plan for you. These visits will include gathering pertinent medical history, needed X-rays, dental impressions, photos, and a CAT Scan. The dentist will then be able to review all the information with the patient and develop the proper course of treatment.

Actual All On 4 Dental Implants Procedure Visit – At this visit the patient will undergo the procedure for placement of the 4 dental implants. Following placement of the dental implants, your dentist 89052 will place the denture in and the patient will leave in the afternoon with a beautiful set of fixed, functional teeth.

Follow-up Appointments – The patient will need to return to the dentist for occasional dental examinations over the next several days, weeks, and months to ensure proper comfort and fit. In about 6 months, the patient will return for a final set of dentures. The reason for the 6 month wait is to give the tissues in the mouth time to heal properly, correct anything the patient wishes to change, and to allow the implants to properly integrate into the bone (the technical term for this is osseointegration).

Conclusion on All on 4 Dental Implants

More than 100 million people in the United States alone are missing between 11 and 15 of their permanent adult teeth. By the age of 60, almost 70% of these people are completely without teeth and in desperate need of complete oral rehabilitation. This is where the all on 4 dental implants procedure comes in and is able to restore people’s teeth and change their outlook on life. Call your dentist today if you feel this procedure might be right for you.

 



Periodontal Disease – is a progressive inflammatory disease, that affects the tissues that support and anchor the teeth. These support tissues include, gums, bone, cementum, and ligament attachments.

The main area in which periodontal disease is diagnosed and treated is in “the pocket”. The pocket is the unattached tissue between the tooth and gum, measured with a tiny ruler-like instrument called a periodontal probe. A healthy tooth generally has pocket measurements of 0-3 mm, whereas diseased tissue can be 4-15 mm deep, ( The deeper the pocket, the more difficult to fully clean). The measurements vary in what they measure, for example, in Gingivitis measurements indicate how swollen the tissue is, while in Periodontitis, the measurements indicate the loss of bone and gum tissue. If  left untreated, periodontal disease results in the destruction of the support structure, bacteria growth down into pockets, toxin release (to breakdown attachments),  loosening of teeth, and subsequent tooth loss.

Stages of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is said to affect over 50% of all Americans. Periodontal disease advances in 4 stages:

1. Gingivitis- Swollen, red, inflamed gum tissue. There has not been loss of attachment at this stage. Reversible with proper hygiene.

2. Early Periodontitis- Less than 25% attachment loss, as determined by x-ray and measurement with a probe.

3. Moderate Periodontitis-25-50% attachment loss as determined above.

4. Advanced Periodontitis-50% or more attachment loss.

Periogen Marielaina Perrone DDS

Periogen Used to Fight Tartar

Periodontal disease can be reversible in its earliest form. This form of periodontal disease is called gingivitis. But if the periodontal disease progresses to periodontitis then the damage is not reversible by the body on its own. Patients and dentists alike are always looking for ways to combat periodontal disease with newer and better ways to treat the disease and maintain good oral hygiene at home. The tried and true home methods have generally consisted of varying types and techniques with  tooth brushing, flossing, and antibacterial rinses. All of these methods have the same limiting factor, none of the at home methods could target the deeper pockets of 5 mm and above, until a new product was formulated in conjunction with the waterpik utilizing a special tip which places a tartar dissolving liquid  directly where it is needed. This new rinse is called Periogen.

What Does Periogen Do to Fight Against Periodontal Disease?

Periogen is a patented oral rinse that has been proven capable of dissolving tartar buildup between professional cleanings and dentist visits. Periogen works by exploiting a weakness (discovered by the research team at the Periogen Company) in the fundamental structure  of oral tartar, and its adhesive nature.

Tartar (or calculus as it is sometimes called) can be found above and below the gum line. Tartar above the gum line is referred to as supra gingival tartar and tartar below the gum line is referred to as sub gingival tartar. Dental Tartar is comprised almost entirely of Calcium Phosphate Salt. Calcium Phosphate is the basic component of tooth material. Calcium phosphate salt differs from calcium phosphate in its electron structure. The calcium phosphate salt has two less electrons than the calcium phosphate which makes it electrically unstable. This process of losing electrons happens in nature all the time. The best comparison is the buildup of lime deposits in water pipes and faucets. Microscopically, tartar is layer upon layer (can be in the tens of thousands layers) of fossilized bacteria trapped between the calcium salts.

The tartar causes periodontal disease by toxins released by the bacteria in plaque and tartar on teeth. The toxins cause the body to react by starting the inflammatory

Periogen Marielaina Perrone DDS

Periogen Oral rinse for Dissolving Tartar Between Professional Cleanings

process thereby destroying healthy gum tissue and supporting bone structures. Periodontal disease is progressive and without periodontal disease treatment will lead to tooth loss and infections throughout the mouth.

Periogen is used as an oral rinse 1-2 times per day between professional cleanings to reduce the level of tartar buildup and stain. This will in turn make for an easier dental visit but also maintain a healthier state in your mouth for your teeth and gums to heal. Periogen should in no way replace brushing and flossing, or visits to the dentist but just works as an accessory between professional dental cleanings to give you a more effective way to reduce tartar and fight periodontal disease .

Periogen Conclusion

As you know, there are many methods and products on the market to aide you in your dental hygiene and combat periodontal disease. Remember this, “The best  offense is a good defense!”.   It is up to you to find and decide what works best for you to prevent periodontal disease. Visit your dentist regularly for dental examinations and professional cleanings to ward off dental problems and stay healthy.

Everyone knows the basic structures of the mouth including your teeth and gums. But there is more to your mouth than just those two anatomical parts. This means

Maintain Oral Health - Marielaina Perrone DDS

Anatomical Structures of the Mouth

maintaining good oral hygiene goes beyond just your teeth and gums.  In addition to your teeth and gums, your mouth is made up oral mucosa, the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw, the tongue, salivary glands, the uvula, and the frenulum. All of these structures play an important role when it comes to good oral health and are regularly examined by your dentist when you receive dental care.

Anatomical Structures of the Mouth

– Oral Mucosa. When you look in your mouth everything that is not a tooth is the oral mucosa. The oral mucosa is a protective lining and includes the gum tissues. This lining is very similar to the lining in your nostrils and inner ears. The oral mucosa plays a very large and essential role in maintaining your oral health. It is also important in maintenance of your overall health by defending against germs and other irritants that come into your mouth. The oral mucosa has a tough component called keratin. Keratin (also found in fingernails and hair) helps keep the oral mucosa protected from injury.

-Gums or gingival tissue. Your gums are the pink, attached, colored tissue that envelops and supports your teeth. Also covered by oral mucosa, gums play a critical role in your oral health. Healthy gums are firm, cover the entire root of the tooth, and do not bleed when brushed, flossed, or probed. Diseased gum tissue, or Periodontal disease can ultimately progress to tooth loss. This makes it essential to take care of your gums by flossing daily and brushing regularly.

-Upper (Maxilla) and Lower (Mandible) Jaws. Your jaws are an essential structure of the mouth and face. The jaws give your face its shape and are the structures holding your teeth. They are needed for chewing and speech. The Upper jaw or Maxilla is made up of two bones fused together and then to the rest of the skull. The lower jawbone (mandible) is separate from the rest of the skull which allows it to move up and down, and side to side in your jaw joint (TMJ) when you speak and chew.

-The Tongue.  This is an extremely strong muscle covered in specialized mucosal tissue that also includes the taste buds. The tongue is unique in that it truly plays a dual role in our health. The tongue plays an integral role in the ability to speak. It does this by allowing people to shape the sounds that come from your mouth. It’s other role is being a part of the body’s digestive system. The tongue is responsible for moving food over to your teeth and following chewing, the tongue moves to the back of the throat so it can force it down to continue on its path thru swallowing. In infants the tongue and jaw work as one to allow the infant to breastfeed.

-Salivary Glands. There are three different major salivary glands in your mouth and neck. These are the parotid, sub mandibular, and the sub lingual glands. There are also smaller, or minor salivary glands in your hard palate, soft palate, and inner lip. These glands are responsible for producing saliva. Saliva is critical to maintaining good oral health. It functions in the following ways:

1) Breakdown of food. Saliva contains special enzymes that help break down food. This makes it easier for you to digest your food.

2)Lubrication. Saliva aides in swallowing food by acting as a carrier of foods out of the mouth and into the throat. Saliva also keeps gums and teeth from drying out. This constant lubrication makes it more difficult for bacteria to stick and stay, and helps keep teeth and gums clean.

3) Protection of teeth and gums. Saliva is able to offer protection of teeth and gums by rinsing away food and bacteria. It is also able to neutralize acids or acidic foods that can wear down your teeth causing tooth cavities.

-The Uvula. The uvula is the small flap of tissue which hangs down at the back of your throat. The uvula is made up of muscle fibers as well as connective and glandular tissues. The uvula is covered by oral mucosa. The uvula’s functions are not fully understood as of yet. However, it seems to play some role in speech and in keeping the mouth and throat moist.

-The Frenulum Linguae. The frenulum or frenum, is an attachment of oral mucosa that connects and pulls two areas together. There is one major frenum attachment above your two front teeth connecting your lip to the adjacent gums, another major one is under the tongue attaching it to the floor of the mouth. There can be any number of minor frenum attachments from lip to gum or cheek to gum.  Children can be born with a frenulum that is too short, or not elastic enough, keeping the tongue almost tied down. This can  affect speech as the tongue is not able to protrude as far as necessary. A short frenum can also affect swallowing and feeding in babies.

Take notice the next time you are brushing your teeth, spend a minute looking at the parts of the mouth that lie farther inside the oral cavity. Knowing what these structures do and what they look like can help you to maintain optimal oral health, and notice changes that can occur. Your self awareness can help you point changes out to your dentist, and find out why they have occurred. As always, see your dentist regularly and have an open line of communication to ensure that your mouth is it’s healthiest!

 

We all have habits some good and some bad. But did you know that some of these habits can affect your teeth?

The following are some habits that can damage your teeth and oral health…

1. Tobacco. This is an obvious one for most people. Smoking turns your beautiful white teeth yellow over time, but it can be much more damaging than that. Smoking or even smokeless tobacco has been shown to cause oral cancer (along with lung and throat cancer), periodontal disease, tooth decay, and eventually tooth loss.

2. Diet pills. Taking these may seem like a quick way to slim your waist line, diet pills can also be an easy way to develop gum disease and tooth decay. Most people do not realize but many over the counter medications, like diet pills, actually cause your body to decrease salivary flow. When salivary flow decreases you increase your risk for tooth decay and periodontal disease. The best prescription for losing weight is a well balanced diet along with regular exercise. Not only will you lose weight but you will protect your smile.

3. Teeth grindingTeeth grinding (also called Bruxism) has a wide range of effects on a person’s smile. Grinding your teeth can affect your temperomandibular joint (commonly referred to as the TMJ), cause premature breakdown of teeth, cause tooth sensitivity, and even change the appearance of your face. People who have normally healthy teeth will over time destroy the outer layer of their teeth(the enamel) which causes chipping, fractures, and sensitivity. Stress is a major factor in teeth grinding so finding ways to relax prior to bedtime will be the long term goal. Your dentist can fabricate a custom night guard for you to protect your teeth and help stop the habit.

4. Choosing not to Floss. Brushing and flossing are equally important. Many people use the excuse that they are really good brushers so they do not need to floss. But that is not the case. Flossing at least once per day is one of the best things you can do for maintenance of your teeth. Flossing helps remove plaque and food debris from around the teeth, in between the teeth and along the gum line. This will help prevent the onset of periodontal disease. Flossing will also help control bad breath by removing the bacteria and food debris causing it in most cases.

5. Brushing at the wrong time. We have always been taught to brush after every meal. But recent studies have shown that depending on what you are consuming it might no be the best idea for you. After eating or drinking foods high in acid (like soft drinks, citrus fruits, or even wine) it is best to rinse with water first to neutralize the acids and then brush about an hour or so later. Researchers have shown this is because right after exposing our teeth to the high acid environment the enamel weakens and the brushing action could cause tooth enamel erosion. So its best to rinse first to neutralize the acid and then brush later.

6. Chewing Ice. This is especially dangerous for your molars in the back of your mouth. Chewing on ice presents an advanced challenge to our teeth. The tremendous forces needed to break thru the ice can crack your teeth or existing fillings. Our molars have pointy edges called cusps and can shear off and break from chewing ice. The coldness of ice can cause the nerves connected to the teeth to get damaged as well. An alternative to crushing the ice with your teeth and let the ice cube melt in your mouth.

7. Sports drinks. These types of drinks have become extremely popular among athletes as well as the general population. But they are hazardous to your teeth. Sports drinks are highly acidic just like soft drinks. This means they can have the same effect as soft drinks in eroding away a tooth’s enamel. Also many of these drinks are high in sugar content which can lead to increased risk for tooth decay.

8. Nail Biting. This is the most commonly found bad habit in children and even adults. When thinking, during stressed times, people tend to put their nails under their teeth

teeth damaged by bad habits

Bad habits Damaging your teeth?

and bite on them continuously. This is an unhygienic habit as all the dirt from the nails will enter your mouth. When you bite on your nails this dirt enters your mouth with your saliva. Also your teeth tend to chip and break when you bite your nails often.

9. White wine. Many people enjoy a glass of wine from time to time whether just relaxing at the end of a long day or with dinner. Most know that red wine can cause staining on teeth so many of us drink white wine. White wine can be just as damaging but in a different way. White wine is extremely acidic and can cause permanent damage to your teeth thru enamel erosion. A good tip is following drinking a glass of white wine rinse out your mouth with water to neutralize and cleanse the acids away. 

 10. Skipping Regular Dental Exams and Cleanings. Even if you brush and floss as recommended, dental plaque and calculus can build up on surface tooth enamel and below the gum line. Periodic dental exams and professional cleanings every 6 months can greatly lower your risk of tooth decay, tooth loss and periodontal disease.