Family & Cosmetic Care in a Comfortable, Relaxed Environment.

Serving Las Vegas and Henderson, Nevada since 1999.

Many believe that periodontal disease is a disease that is solely based on genetics. My grandparents had dentures, my parents had dentures, so will I. The truth is, that genetics plays a role, but is not a sentence for dentures. There are risks and limitations in the progression of periodontal disease… Can each patient limit the risks of developing full blown progressive periodontal disease?….The answer is a resounding…YES! It takes a good oral hygiene regimen, knowledge of the current state of your condition, and frequent professional cleaning to keep our mouths in a healthy, disease-free state.

Risk Factors Of Periodontal Disease

Patient Caused Risk Factors

-Poor Oral Hygiene – This is an obvious one that each individual can control. Brushing, flossing, rinsing, and seeking regular dental care are essential steps to remain periodontal disease free and avoid progression beyond gingivitis.

-Age - Research has shown that older people have the highest rates of periodontal disease. The research shows that over 70% of Americans 65 and older have periodontitis.

-Smoking Or Tobacco UseTobacco use is linked with many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung disease and heart disease, as well as numerous other health problems. Tobacco users also are at increased risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

-Poor nutrition- Eating an unhealthy diet will not supply you with the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for tissue healing and repair.

-Anatomy - The local anatomic risk factors for periodontal disease include:,

1. Furcation anatomy. These are the spaces between roots of molars.  In many instances, the entrance of  such furcations are restricted enough to limit access for proper hygiene maintenance. Risk factors for periodontal disease are classified according to their involvement in tooth furcations. A Grade I CEP presents with minimal projection of enamel toward the entrance of the furaction. A Grade II CEP approximates the entrance of the furcation, and the tip of a Grade Ill CEP is well within the furcation.

2. Common anatomic deformities. These interfere with a patient’s ability to effectively remove plaque biofilm which are one of the risk factors for periodontal disease. An example are Cervical enamel projections (CEP). CEPs are tooth developmental deformities of the CEJ found on molars.

4. Palato-gingival grooves (PGG). POGs are tooth developmental deformities of maxillary central and lateral incisors. They begin in lingual pits and extend vertically onto root surfaces. PGGs could, on rare occasions, extend to the root apex. PGGs are commonly associated risk factors for periodontal disease with increased gingival inflammation, plaque accumulation, and probing depth.

5. Open contacts, loss of interdental papilla, and food impaction. Open contacts between teeth may allow for easy food impaction. Food impaction is defined as the forceful wedging of food between teeth. Loss of the pointed papilla between teeth leaves another area for food impaction.

-Medications - Some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, anti-depressants, and certain heart medicines, can have an affect on your oral health, causing dry mouth, inflammation and gum tissue overgrowth. It is important to tell your dentist the medications you might be on so they can tailor a treatment schedule for your needs.

-Other Disease - These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.  These diseases can interfere with the inflammatory process, causing healing problems, and may worsen the condition of the gums.

-Poor Nutrition – A diet without all the essential nutrients for our bodies to function can compromise our immune systems, decrease healing ability, and make tissue weaker and easier to breakdown. This will make it harder to fight off infection. Since, periodontal disease essentially begins as an infection, this lack of nutrition can make the periodontal disease develop and progress faster than it normally would. Studies have also linked obesity with an increased risk of periodontal disease.

Dentist Caused Risk Factors

-Overhanging dental restorations – A poorly completed dental restoration typically has dental material overhanging the tooth. This creates an issue keeping the area clean and also creates an area for food and bacteria to build up. These overhangs can be irritating to the tissues and retain plaque and food more easily.

-Violation of the “biologic width” –  is the height between the deepest point of the gum pocket and the bone. This distance is important to consider when fabricating any dental restorations, because they must respect the natural architecture of the gingival attachment if harmful consequences are to be avoided. These consequences include bone and tissue recession.

-Open contacts and food impaction - If a dentist places a new dental restoration and does not create the proper tight contact between adjacent teeth, that area becomes a food and plaque trap. It will necessitate improved dental hygiene in that area to keep it clean. More often than not, food and debris will accumulate creating a localized area of periodontal disease.

-Occlusal trauma – If a new restoration is not properly set in alignment with the other teeth, a patient can create damage to the tooth as well as the surrounding tissue just from the act of chewing. The bite should always be checked and adjusted after dental work to prevent trauma to an individual tooth.

Periodontal Disease Conclusion

Luckily, with the exception of the anatomy we are born with, all of these periodontal disease risk factors can be overcome. The first step is to practice good oral hygiene by brushing, flossing, and using an antibacterial mouthrinse. The second step is to choose a well qualified dentist and keep a regular schedule to help give you the best fighting chance at preventing,  treating and stabilizing periodontal disease.

Periodontal Disease – is a progressive inflammatory disease, that affects the tissues that support and anchor the teeth. These support tissues include, gums, bone, cementum, and ligament attachments.

The main area in which periodontal disease is diagnosed and treated is in “the pocket”. The pocket is the unattached tissue between the tooth and gum, measured with a tiny ruler-like instrument called a periodontal probe. A healthy tooth generally has pocket measurements of 0-3 mm, whereas diseased tissue can be 4-15 mm deep, ( The deeper the pocket, the more difficult to fully clean). The measurements vary in what they measure, for example, in Gingivitis measurements indicate how swollen the tissue is, while in Periodontitis, the measurements indicate the loss of bone and gum tissue. If  left untreated, periodontal disease results in the destruction of the support structure, bacteria growth down into pockets, toxin release (to breakdown attachments),  loosening of teeth, and subsequent tooth loss.

Stages of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is said to affect over 50% of all Americans. Periodontal disease advances in 4 stages:

1. Gingivitis- Swollen, red, inflamed gum tissue. There has not been loss of attachment at this stage. Reversible with proper hygiene.

2. Early Periodontitis- Less than 25% attachment loss, as determined by x-ray and measurement with a probe.

3. Moderate Periodontitis-25-50% attachment loss as determined above.

4. Advanced Periodontitis-50% or more attachment loss.

Periogen Marielaina Perrone DDS

Periogen Used to Fight Tartar

Periodontal disease can be reversible in its earliest form. This form of periodontal disease is called gingivitis. But if the periodontal disease progresses to periodontitis then the damage is not reversible by the body on its own. Patients and dentists alike are always looking for ways to combat periodontal disease with newer and better ways to treat the disease and maintain good oral hygiene at home. The tried and true home methods have generally consisted of varying types and techniques with  tooth brushing, flossing, and antibacterial rinses. All of these methods have the same limiting factor, none of the at home methods could target the deeper pockets of 5 mm and above, until a new product was formulated in conjunction with the waterpik utilizing a special tip which places a tartar dissolving liquid  directly where it is needed. This new rinse is called Periogen.

What Does Periogen Do to Fight Against Periodontal Disease?

Periogen is a patented oral rinse that has been proven capable of dissolving tartar buildup between professional cleanings and dentist visits. Periogen works by exploiting a weakness (discovered by the research team at the Periogen Company) in the fundamental structure  of oral tartar, and its adhesive nature.

Tartar (or calculus as it is sometimes called) can be found above and below the gum line. Tartar above the gum line is referred to as supra gingival tartar and tartar below the gum line is referred to as sub gingival tartar. Dental Tartar is comprised almost entirely of Calcium Phosphate Salt. Calcium Phosphate is the basic component of tooth material. Calcium phosphate salt differs from calcium phosphate in its electron structure. The calcium phosphate salt has two less electrons than the calcium phosphate which makes it electrically unstable. This process of losing electrons happens in nature all the time. The best comparison is the buildup of lime deposits in water pipes and faucets. Microscopically, tartar is layer upon layer (can be in the tens of thousands layers) of fossilized bacteria trapped between the calcium salts.

The tartar causes periodontal disease by toxins released by the bacteria in plaque and tartar on teeth. The toxins cause the body to react by starting the inflammatory

Periogen Marielaina Perrone DDS

Periogen Oral rinse for Dissolving Tartar Between Professional Cleanings

process thereby destroying healthy gum tissue and supporting bone structures. Periodontal disease is progressive and without periodontal disease treatment will lead to tooth loss and infections throughout the mouth.

Periogen is used as an oral rinse 1-2 times per day between professional cleanings to reduce the level of tartar buildup and stain. This will in turn make for an easier dental visit but also maintain a healthier state in your mouth for your teeth and gums to heal. Periogen should in no way replace brushing and flossing, or visits to the dentist but just works as an accessory between professional dental cleanings to give you a more effective way to reduce tartar and fight periodontal disease .

Periogen Conclusion

As you know, there are many methods and products on the market to aide you in your dental hygiene and combat periodontal disease. Remember this, “The best  offense is a good defense!”.   It is up to you to find and decide what works best for you to prevent periodontal disease. Visit your dentist regularly for dental examinations and professional cleanings to ward off dental problems and stay healthy.