Family & Cosmetic Care in a Comfortable, Relaxed Environment.

Serving Las Vegas and Henderson, Nevada since 1999.

It is Holiday time again…holiday parties, office parties, and social occasions with friends. Time to get yourself ready for these holiday events with a bright, shiny smile and clean, fresh breath.

Start with the Basics for Best Holiday Dental Health

The basics include brushing at least twice a day (for at least 2 minutes each time) and flossing daily. This is the foundation for a healthy smile and fresh breath. Brushing and flossing properly allow you to remove the food debris and plaque that builds up each day from our daily activities. This plaque and food debris, if left, will eventually cause tooth decay, periodontal disease, and bad breath.

Tip for fresh breath: Brushing your teeth and flossing work very well to reduce bad breath, but did you know there was another way to freshen your breath? Tongue cleaning or scraping removes dead cells and unwanted food particles from the folds of your tongue. The debris on your tongue is responsible for a good portion of bad breath.You can buy a specially designed tongue scraper or just use a separate toothbrush after brushing your teeth. Studies have shown this can improve breath by as much as 20%.

Choose Healthy Snacks this Holiday

Make a conscious choice this holiday to choose healthier options. These options can include a carrot, a stick of celery, or even an apple. These types of snacks also work well to help clean stickier foods and plaque off your teeth. They also have an added benefit of increasing salivary flow which will help neutralize acids and wash away bacteria from your teeth, gums, and tongue.

Tip for fresh breath: Chew on some garnish! You will usually find garnishes of parsley or mint on a holiday tray of food. Parsley is a breath saver because it contains chlorophyll, a well known breath deodorizer. Chewing on a few raw mint leaves will freshen your breath very quickly.

Choose the Right Drinks

As many of us are aware drinking certain beverages will lead to staining of our teeth. These beverages include soft drinks, black tea, coffee, and red wine. If you do choose to partake in these beverages try to use a straw to limit exposure to your teeth, or swish and swallow water directly after. This will not only help reduce stains but also lower the acid and sugar exposure on your teeth. Drinks high in sugar dry your mouth and make you thirstier, a dry mouth generally leads to bad breath.

Tip for fresh breath: Choose to drink water instead! Water will not stain your teeth and it helps keep bad breath under control because it washes away food particles and bacteria, the primary cause of bad breath. It also helps you avoid “dry mouth,” another cause of bad breath, by staying well hydrated. A good tip is also to try drinking green tea: gargling or rinsing your mouth with green tea suppresses the growth of bacteria that cause mouth odor as well as decrease your risks of tooth decay.

Quick Tips For a Pre Holiday Freshen Up

Some mouth rinses or breath fresheners may actually worsen a bad breath problem by irritating oral tissue with their high alcohol content. For an emergency freshen-up, try a quick rinse with a mix of water and a few drops of peppermint oil. Or, you can eat a piece of sugarless candy or chew sugarless gum. Sucking on a piece of sugarless candy or chewing sugarless gum stimulates saliva flow, which will help to wash away food debris and bacteria that cause bad breath. A breath spray can also help. most are minty and cover odors briefly, but you can try something like closys which actually neutralizes mouth odor.

If you follow these tips throughout the holiday season, you may find that not only will you enjoy your holiday festivities, confident in your bright smile and sparkling fresh breath, but also that you have improved your oral health for the coming new year. Remember the holidays are a time to smile joyously so feel comfortable knowing you have healthy teeth and fresh breath. Enjoy the holidays!!

Being pregnant is an exciting time but it can bring with it lots of anxiety. Anxiety over doing what it is right for you and your baby’s health. This should include dental health as well since there have been direct links between oral health and our overall health. Once you know you are pregnant it is never too early to start thinking about dental health. A baby’s teeth are already beginning to form by about the 5th-6th week following conception. By the time your baby is born all 20 of their baby (primary) teeth are almost completely formed. Below you will find some helpful tips to care for your dental health as well as the baby’s.

What To Expecting When Expecting Your Baby

Does the calcium for my child’s teeth come from my teeth?

No! This is a common myth but it is simply not true. The baby receives all calcium just like their other nutrients from the mother’s dietary intake.

What’s The Best Way To Maintain My Dental Health While Pregnant?

Maintaining dental health during pregnancy is similar to when not pregnant. To prevent tooth decay and periodontal disease it is important to brush your teeth at least 2x per day, floss at least once per day, and use an antibacterial rinse. Pregnancy gingivitis (earliest stage of periodontal disease) can be especially problemsome especially during the 7th-8th month of pregnancy as hormones are raging. Almost one half of women experience pregnancy gingivitis, starting in the 2nd or 3rd month of pregnancy. It generally increases in severity all the way through to the eighth month. This pregnancy gingivitis can be very uncomfortable and cause inflammation, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gums. If you already have poor dental hygiene and periodontal disease before pregnancy begins, expect an extreme progression in your periodontal condition as you end your first trimester and onward. In some women, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large growths. These are called pregnancy tumors. These are not cancerous and are usually painless in nature. This tumor may require removal by a dentist if it persists. Research has suggested that pregnant women who have severe periodontal disease may be at a higher risk for preterm birth and low birth weight

Is Fluoride Safe?

For women who take fluoride supplements during pregnancy, it is expected that the added fluoride will help their children form strong teeth. However, this is a controversial subject and has not been fully studied. Additional fluoride will not necessarily aid in the process of enamel formation because fluoride works best when the teeth have fully formed and have erupted in the mouth. Fluoride changes the chemical bonds in the enamel of the erupted teeth to make it more resistant to tooth decay. More research studies are needed to determine the advantages, if any, and the safe dosage levels for prenatal fluoride supplementation.

What About Medications Used In Dental Work During Pregnancy?

Lidocaine is the most commonly used drug for dental work. Lidocaine (category B – No evidence of risk in humans. This category has shown adverse effects in animal trials but in controlled human trials have been deemed to be safe with no increased risk of fetal abnormalities.) is able to cross the placenta after administration. Any local anesthesia can cross the placenta and cause fetal depression, therefore anesthesia dosage should be limited to the minimum required to keep patient comfortable. Luckily, most dentistry can be completed with very small amounts of local anesthetic, thus causing no danger to mom or baby. A major study was completed spanning about 35 years and tracking 55,000 children. The study showed no evidence of any adverse reactions from local anesthetic use in pregnant women.

Dental work often requires antibiotics to prevent or treat infections. Antibiotics such as penicillin, amoxicillin, and clindamycin, which are also labeled category B for safety in pregnancy, may be prescribed after your procedure. The penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics most commonly used in dentistry (penicillin V, amoxicillin, and caphalexin) are generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. Clindamycin, metronidazole, and erythromycin are also believed to have minimal risk. Tetracyclines, including doxycycline, have shown to cause tooth discoloration and impaired bone metabolism. As a side note, taking antibiotics while using birth control medications will generally cause the birth control to be ineffective.

Will My Teeth Be Affected By Morning Sickness?

Vomiting due to morning sickness can lead to erosion of the enamel on the back of your front teeth. However, it is unlikely since the morning sickness lasts for such a short period of time. This is more likely to occur with frequent vomiting over a long period of time. If this is a concern of yours be sure to rinse with water and brush following bouts of morning sickness.

When Is The Best Time To Have Dental Work Performed?

Routine dental maintenance can be performed at any time but during third trimester it might be more difficult to sit in dental chair for long periods of time. The ideal time to see your dentist is during your second trimester, since your baby is more vulnerable during the first and third trimesters, when major development is occurring (first trimester) and the risk of premature delivery increases (late third trimester).

Can I Have My Teeth Whitened While Pregnant?

If you are pregnant, it is suggested to hole off from the use of bleaching agents, this also includes the use of whitening toothpastes. Teeth whitening may be resumed after pregnancy.

Pregnancy Conclusion

One of the best things you can do as an expectant mother is to maintain your own dental and general health.This should include a nutritious diet, regular visits to your physician as well as your dentist. A healthy mom will lead to an easier pregnancy as well as an easier time recovering after birth.

Dental implants have become highly utilized in dentistry. Oftentimes, another procedure called a bone graft, is required to aide in the stabilization of  dental implants. The success of dental implants depends on the quality and quantity of bone present. If the bone is of poor quality or low quantity the dental implants have a much lower chance of success. Adequate bone structure is required for a dental implant to integrate (become one with the surrounding bone), and be strong enough to chew on. Bone grafting is a surgical procedure that can increase the quality and/or quality of the bone to then directly effect the chance of dental implants success. Not all dental implants require bone grafts, so when do you need them?

When Are Dental Bone Grafts Needed For Dental Implants?

-The existing bone has insufficient width. This could be a genetic factor where the bone width is lacking naturally or it could be from damage over time from periodontal disease.

-The existing bone has insufficient height. The height of the bone is just as critical as the width as it ensures the dental implant is properly anchored to support the stress of function (biting and chewing food).

-The maxillary sinus is too close to area of placement. This usually means that there is not enough bone between the tooth area and the sinus. Generally this can be fixed by lifting the sinus membrane (Sinus Lift) and placing bone graft material.

-Inadequate bone as a result of previous tooth or teeth removal. Sometimes when teeth are removed or fall out, bone can be removed as well. The bone will also decrease and remodel once the tooth is removed as it no longer is needed to hold a tooth in place.

-Not enough bone due to periodontal disease or trauma. Periodontal disease and trauma can lead to there not being enough bone for a successful dental implant.

-Inadequate bone due to defect in development that affects growth of bone in the jaw.

-Insufficient bone caused by the removal of cysts or tumors in the mouth. If the removal of a cyst or tumor is required there will also be removal of some of the bone, there may not be enough left for the dental implant to be successful. After removal of oral pathology, healing time is required so that bone quality and quantity can be reevaluated.

Bone Grafting Procedure

Where Does the Bone Come From?

Bone grafting procedures involve the use of your bone, cadaver bone, cow bone, and synthetic bone. Your own bone will most likely come from your chin or ramus (the back part of your lower jaw). If your dentist is unable to get enough bone from either of these areas, they may need to get bone from your hip or shin bone (tibia) instead. The hip is considered to be a better source because the hip bone can provide a large amount of bone. The marrow from either the hip or shin (tibia) contains bone-forming cells. However bone taken from your hip requires a visit to the hospital along with general anesthesia. Cadaver bone and cow bone is sterilized and broken down into small chips for easy placement.  Man made synthetic materials are also widely used for bone grafting. The synthetic bone acts as a scaffold for new bone to build on.

Newer products containing growth factors have also been developed.  Some are used to enhance bone graft materials and others are used in place of bone grafting. One of these products, BMP-2 stimulates certain body cells to turn into bone. The BMP-2 protein occurs naturally in the body.

What Happens During Bone Grafting?

A good example is a patient that needs to have a single tooth extracted and wants to have it replaced with a dental implant and dental crown. There may be a bone defect in the area or the tooth is large and needs to have some bone placed to fill in the expansive space. In this case, a dental bone graft is ideal and necessary to support the future dental implant.

Before the procedure, you will need to have either a CT scan or a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. The images of a CT or CBCT provide valuable information about bone quantity and show where important nerves and sinuses are located which need to be avoided. A CBCT actually provides a 3-D image of your bone and any defects present. Local anesthesia will be used to numb the area where the bone augmentation is needed (called the recipient site) as well as the area from where bone will be removed (donor site) if using your own bone. An incision in the gum tissue where the implant will be placed is made to determine how much and what type of bone is needed.

The most common type of graft is called a socket graft. This is used to fill the space left behind by the lost tooth. The material used most often in a socket graft is often comprised of cow bone. This bone is harvested from known healthy cows and is processed through a freeze drying procedure that renders a sterile end product containing only the mineral content of natural bone. The graft is applied to the empty hole immediately after a tooth extraction and is secured using sutures (stitches).

Following the bone grafting procedure the patient will be given antibiotics, pain medicine, and an antibacterial mouthwash. You will need to avoid certain foods. You also will be told how to avoid putting pressure on the area or damaging it while it heals. If you wear a denture, you may not be able to wear it for a month or longer while the area heals. If you have natural teeth around the bone graft, your dentist may make a temporary removable bridge or denture to help protect the area.

Success of Bone Grafting

The success rate for bone grafts in the jaws for the purpose of placing dental implants is very high. However, there is a small chance that the bone graft will fail, even if your own bone was used. Bone grafts are not rejected like organ transplants. It is not exactly known why some dental grafts fail. There is a higher risk of failure in patients with diabetes, who smoke, or have periodontal disease. A failed graft can be removed. Once the area has healed, your dentist may choose to place a second bone graft.

Dental Bone Grafts Conclusion

Without dental bone grafts many would be unable to restore their smiles with dental implants. Just like dental implants, dental bone grafts are highly successful procedures to restore a smile to its natural state. Every case is different and the need for bone grafting varies from person to person and tooth to tooth. You can discuss the need for possible bone grafting with your dentist to see if it would benefit your procedure.

 

We often go on and off diets throughout the year but did you know dieting can have harmful effects on our dental health? Research is mounting about a direct connection between our general health and our dental health. Below you will find useful tips to follow when dieting to maintain your beautiful smile.

Direct Connection Between Dental Health And General Health

-Do Not Graze. Depending on the diet and your cravings you may tend to eat smaller meals throughout the day. Every time we eat a meal or a snack, we are bombarding our mouths with acids, sugars, and possible staining foods and drink. If grazing is part of your diet it is important to brush, rinse, and floss more often. This will help neutralize your oral cavity to prevent development of tooth decay and periodontal disease. A good tip is to have what are called scrubber foods like celery as part of your meal. This will naturally clean your teeth while eating.

-Watch Your Drink. Many diets include using juice mixtures or even smoothies. These are easy ways to get fruits and vegetables into our systems. It is important to note these same healthy drinks can be high in sugars and acids. This can be a double whammy on our oral health. A third thing to look out for is staining of our teeth as many of these ingredients have strong pigments which can darken our teeth over time. An excellent tip when juicing or drinking smoothies is to use a straw to allow the sugars and acids to pass your teeth. It is also important to routinely rinse with water.

-Choose Food And Drink Wisely. Many choose diet soda to kill the cravings of dieting. However, diet soda may be low in sugar content but high in acidic content. The acids can be very difficult on our teeth. Once again, drink through a straw to help avoid exposure. Another tip is to be aware of the dangers of many diet friendly snacks like dried fruit which can stick to our teeth leading to increased tooth decay.

-Keep Hydrated With Water. Drinking water throughout the day will make you feel fuller and help your diet but it will also maintain a neutral balance in your oral environment.

-Ensure You Are Getting Proper Vitamins And Minerals. We often overlook the balance in our diet when dieting. This can create a deficit in our vitamin and mineral intake. To remain healthy it is important to get the right balance of vitamins and minerals into our bodies.

Dieting And Oral Health Conclusion

It is important to remember there is a definite connection between general health and our dental health. If we are able to maintain the proper balance we will live happier, fuller lives full of smiles.