Family & Cosmetic Dental Care in a Relaxed Environment.

Exceptional Dentistry Las Vegas and Henderson NV Since 1999.

Dental Implants, Teeth Whitening, Porcelain Veneers, &
Botox Cosmetic.

Call Today For Consultation!

Email Us
Directions



We have all had it happen…we are sitting in our favorite pizza place waiting for our food to arrive and we impatiently take that first bite as soon as it comes. Next thing we know, we’ve just burned our tongue or roof of the mouth with the hot pizza. That burned  mouth pain will remind us, that we should have waited for that pizza to cool off. We now, regretfully, look towards days of discomfort and pain.

Degrees Of Burn

First Degree Burn – normal signs and symptoms of a 1st degree burn include pain, redness, dryness, and minimal swelling. If you have a first-degree burn in your mouth, the topmost layer of affected tissue in your mouth may peel in 1-2 days, and your mouth should heal on its own in about 3-6 days time. This is the usual “pizza burn”.

Second  degree burns -This level of burn in your mouth and throat can lead to further complications. Second-degree burns often cause severe pain, redness and blistering. This burn involves layers beneath your top layer of skin. They may not heal for weeks and are at higher risk of complications such as infection.

Third-degree burns-This type of burn requires immediate medical attention. Third degree burns can lead to dry, brown, charred, or waxy, white skin. This type of burn usually involves all layers of underlying tissues and may require a skin graft. Because this type of burn damages the nerves, it may not initially be painful. Get immediate medical attention if you think your mouth has a second- or third-degree burn or if you have any internal mouth burn that swells, develops infection and increases in redness.

Tips For A “Pizza Burned” Mouth

The next time a first degree mouth burn happens to you, follow these simple steps to find relief and let it heal faster:

1. Apply Ice – Sucking on an ice cube or eating ice cream can help bring relief from the burning sensation. Even gargling with ice cold water can give relief.

2. Drink Milk – Milk is a great tool in this situation because of its coating action on the skin in the mouth. The milk will coat the burned area.

3. Pain Medication – These can include Tylenol, Advil, Aspirin, or Alleve. These are all  good choices to relieve some of the discomfort. A product called orabase is sometimes helpful as well. Orabase is a topical anesthetic that can help directly on the burned area acting in a localized way. Don’t use anbesol or aspirin directly on a burn, it tends to further irritate the damaged tissues.

4. Avoid Certain Foods – While the burn is healing you want to avoid any food that might irritate it further. These can include acidic foods, crunchy foods, very hot foods,   or even very salty and spicy dressings.

5. Vitamin E – This has been shown to promote would healing so squeezing vitamin E from a capsule over the wound can speed up healing and allow new tissue to grow in and heal the wound.

Another good tip is to maintain good oral hygiene during this period to avoid further infection or irritation. You should keep the area as clean as possible just like any wound on the body. Warm saline rinses are also helpful. This extra care will facilitate healing.

Conclusion

All of us have burned our mouths in the past, and are highly likely to do it again in the future. Try to monitor the temperature of the foods you will be eating, and remember to be patient enough to wait before eating smoking hot food.Use your best judgement before diving into a scalding hot meal or drink, and you will have less frequent painful mouth burns. Another good tip, is to take smaller test bites, so if it is too hot, we would only create a very small burn to our mouth and not have as much discomfort. So, enjoy your pizza, take care not to burn yourself, and if you do, take the proper steps for relief.



What many people don’t realize, is that a tooth has nerves and blood vessels just like the rest of our body. A tooth is “vital” or alive. There are reasons why a tooth can become non vital, or dead. ItCosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDS is not always easy to tell, and sometimes can be quite painful.

A dead tooth is simply a tooth that no longer has access to nutrients and blood flow. Our teeth are composed of three layers: the enamel, the dentin and the nerve or “pulp”. A healthy tooth has living cells and tissue inside.This living tissue plays a role in the development of the teeth. The nerve is the part of the tooth that can sense temperature, when you drink or eat something really cold or hot. It can also sense how hard you are biting into something, and feel pain.

All the blood vessels and nerve fibers are located in the pulp and this means that when the pulp is dead, then the tooth is dies as well. What can happen if a tooth becomes non vital, and why does it die?

What Causes a Tooth To Die?

The two main causes are:

Tooth Decay – Tooth decay or a bacterial infection, when left untreated, will begin to invade deeper into the tooth eventually penetrating through enamel and into the second layer, the dentin. When the decay or infection reaches deep inside the tooth, the cells of the pulp try to fight it off by triggering the inflammatory process. This includes action by the white blood cells. Pus develops when some of the white blood cells die during the battle against the infection. If the infection is not treated at this stage, all the white blood cells will die and the blood flow will stop completely.When this occurs, tooth sensitivity is usually the first sign of trouble and this sensitivity will eventually reach the pulp and results in a severe toothache.

Dental Trauma – This can occur from traumatic injuries, falls, severe grinding and clenching, biting into very hard objects, and sometimes idiopathic internal resorption (a tooth self destructs from the inside out for no apparent reason) . When dental trauma occurs, the blood supply can be severed immediately, resulting in the pulp dying off. Sometimes it is a slow progressive breakdown as teeth wear and crack from bad oral habits. Prevention is the key whenever possible. This is why sports mouth guards are recommended for all contact sports activities. Nightguards are recommended for clenchers and grinders. Extremely hard foods should be avoided such as popcorn kernels, corn nuts, and the mouth should not be used in place of tools such as scissors or a bottle opener.

Signs and Symptoms

It can be very difficult to identify a dead tooth just by looking at it and that is another reason why it’s important to visit a dentist regularly. It is possible to have no symptoms when a tooth becomes non vital. However, a non-vital tooth may exhibit some a tell tale symptom like turning darker. This discoloration is usually the dead pulp becoming visible. Another sign of a non-vital tooth is an unexplained swelling, or a raised white pimple like area. These signs are normally a result of a periodontal abscess, caused by periodontal disease or injury, which can rupture and produce an infection in the gums and mouth. A dead tooth will eventually become loose due to the destruction of surrounding bone by the infection process. It can also produce a foul odor and even more severe pain.

Cosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDSTreatment Of A Dead Tooth

Many patients will ask, “If the tooth is dead why not just leave it alone?”.Simply put, the dead tissue in the pulp chamber will become a breeding ground for bacteria. If left untreated, an abscess can occur along with pain and discomfort. There are usually two options for treatment of a non vital tooth:

Extraction – A tooth extraction can be performed if the tooth is not savable, or it can be chosen due to finances becoming an issue. A tooth extraction is usually the least expensive option but it can also can leave other issues on the long term horizon (such as tooth shifting, cosmetic and functional issues). Once extracted, tooth replacement can be done using a dental implant, a fixed bridge, or a removable denture.

Root Canal Therapy –  This procedure is performed when a patient chooses to save the tooth. Root canal therapy allows the dentist to clean out the dead tissue and infection, ridding of the decayed part of the pulp. This will allow the dentist to rebuild on the sterile tooth to return full form and function. With today’s modern technology, root canal therapy can be a painless and comfortable experience and, if done early, can save a tooth by preventing further infection and subsequent tooth loss. The procedure usually begins with anesthesia to prevent any pain, then a dentist will make an opening for the cleaning instrument to penetrate the affected inner parts of the tooth. The infection is cleaned out and the opening is then closed with a filling. The tooth can then be bleached to turn it whiter or a veneer or a crown can be placed over the tooth to make it look natural.

How To Prevent A Tooth Becoming Non-Vital

Maintaining a proper dental hygiene regimen including brushing and flossing regularly can prevent the buildup of food and bacteria that gets trapped between teeth and gums, which can cause infection and tooth decay leading to dead teeth. Regular visits to the dentist are also very important, since your dentist will be able to identify and diagnose early signs of tooth issues. There are other early signs that you can recognize on your own that include sensitivity to heat or cold, pain when chewing or biting down, slight discolorations, bad breath, gum swelling and facial swelling. Saving a dead tooth depends on early detection and early treatment. Do not ignore the signs and symptoms – get it checked out to decrease your chances of infection and tooth loss.

Dry socket (also called alveolar osteitis) is an extremely painful dental condition that can occur after removal (extraction) of a permanent adult tooth.

Having a tooth removed is generally not something anyone looks forward to. Most people understand there will be some level of discomfort following the procedure.  Many are given a prescription for pain medication before leaving their dentist. Most people in fact do not even need to get the prescription filled. However, when a patient experiences what is called a dry socket the pain can become quite intense and linger for days.

Very few people are affected by dry socket. The development of Dry socket after a tooth extraction occurs in only about 2-3% of patients. For those who experience dry socket it can be a very scary experience. Fortunately dry socket is treatable.

A dry socket occurs when the blood clot at the site of the tooth extraction has never fully formed, has broken free, or has dissolved before the wound has had a chance to fully heal. The blood clot is the protective layer for the underlying bone and nerves, it begins the process of healing so that gum tissue and bone can refill the area. When the clot is gone the bone and nerves are now exposed to the outside air, food, fluid, and anything else that enters the mouth. This can lead to a dry socket with sharp, aching pain that can last for 5-6 days, and in the case of a patient taking fosamax type drugs the pain can last for weeks.

A dry socket is considered the most common complication following tooth extractions. It happens more frequently with extraction of impacted wisdom teeth, in patients with poor blood flow to the socket, (smokers, patients taking fosamax), delayed healing (diabetics ).  The pain begins to build and develop about 2-4 days following the procedure.

Signs and Symptoms of Dry Socket

Signs and symptoms of dry socket may include:

-Sharp, aching pain within 2-4 days after a tooth removal.

explanation of dry socket

Graphic explanation of dry socket…image courtesy of Dental Care Matters

-Partial or total loss of the blood clot at the tooth extraction site. You would be able to visually notice a deep hole or space where tooth used to be, that weeps fluid when pressed vs a blood clot overlaying the site.

-Bone that is visible upon visual examination in the socket

-Pain that radiates from the socket to your ear, eye, temple or neck on the same side of your face as the extraction

-Abnormally bad breath or a foul odor emanating from your mouth. This will coincide with having a bad taste in your mouth as well.

-If you have swollen lymph nodes around your jaw or neck, this is a sign of infection and you need to be seen by your dentist immediately.

Over the counter medications by themselves will not control the symptoms. Your dentist or oral surgeon will need to begin treatments to lessen pain and allow for healing to take place.

Treatment of Dry Socket

Taking a nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drug (NSAID – aspirin or ibuprofen) can help to ease the pain but probably will not be enough to take it away completely. When the pain persists you should call your dentist immediately. The dentist may prescribe you a stronger pain medication to allow the pain to subside for you or give you anesthesia in the office to relieve some of the symptoms for a little while anyway.

paste for dry socket

Paste for Dry Socket

What will your dentist need to do for the dry socket? Your dentist will need to numb and clean the tooth socket. This will allow for  removal of any debris from the space where the tooth once was, and allow for rebleeding into the site. The dentist may then fill the socket with a medicated dressing or a special paste to promote healing and soothe the symptoms. Patients with dry socket dressings generally need to come back to be seen by the dentist every day until the pain subsides. The dressing needs to be changed daily. Warm cloth on the outside of the face also helps promote blood flow.

An antibiotic may also be prescribed at this point to prevent an infection from forming. At home care will include rinsing with salt water and being careful what you eat and how you eat it, ( avoiding the side where the dry socket is ).

The site will usually heal completely following treatment in 1-2 weeks.

Who is most likely to get a Dry Socket?

Some patients will be more likely than others to get a dry socket after a tooth extraction. These include the following:

Smokers. Patients who smoke have twice the chance of developing dry socket over those who do not. Smoking also is believed to slow the healing process.

Poor Oral Hygiene. Those with poor oral hygiene will have an increased risk due to the amount of bacteria in the mouth. Will be difficult to maintain a sterile field when removing tooth.

Having wisdom teeth (3rd molars) extracted. Increased trauma to area during procedure is one of the indicators for increasing the possibility for the development of dry socket. 3rd molars tend to be more difficult to remove especially if they are fully or partially impacted.

Previous history of dry socket. If you have had dry socket previously, you are more likely to develop it after another extraction.

Use of birth control pills. Contraceptives which contain estrogen effect the blood clotting system of the body. So we see an increased incidence in dry socket in patients on oral contraceptives.

Rinsing and spitting a lot or smoking after having a tooth extracted also can increase your risk of getting dry socket. These activities will increase chances of the blood clot becoming dislodged.

Following the removal of a tooth it is very important to follow all instructions given to you by your dentist. If you are unsure of anything you must ask or call back. At first sign of pain or discomfort call your dentist to be sure it is not something more serious. As always, maintain a regular schedule visiting your dentist, as well as keeping an open communication with your dentist. This will make you feel comfortable asking questions and knowing you are getting the proper information to care for your oral health.