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Let’s be honest, most people do not floss regularly even though they know they should. Flossing is an integral part of any dental hygiene program. Brushing alone is not able to remove the bacteria and food debris that builds up between and around our teeth. Proper flossing can help prevent not only tooth decay but also tooth loss as well. So, what are the rules of flossing for you to follow? Below you will find the basics to floss porperly…

6 Rules To Great Flossing

-Floss Everyday. Most prefer flossing at bedtime but it can really be done at any point in the day. Flossing can and should be performed more than once a day. The main goal of flossing is to remove the plaque and food debris from between and around your teeth.

-Everyone With Teeth Or Dental Implants Should Floss. This includes kids, adults, and seniors. The general rule for flossing is if you want to keep your teeth or implants, you should floss. Flossing is often overlooked especially for children and those who do not have many teeth. It is never too early or late to start with good habits. Proper flossing will lead you toward a lifetime of good oral health.

-Follow Proper Flossing Technique. Often times people floss with no idea of what they are doing…just going through the motions. The proper technique for flossing covers all aspects of your teeth going up and down between teeth as well as around them. The goal of flossing is to reach areas of the mouth that brushing alone is unable to.

-Be Aware Of Bleeding GumsBleeding gums can happen on occasion when flossing. It can occur from improper flossing technique or ,more than likely, it is occuring because of the presence of early  periodontal disease. For many, it can be inflamed gums due to gingivitis, which is reversible. Medications and illness can also cause bleeding gums.  If your gums continue bleeding after 2 weeks of proper flossing  and brushing, see your dentist immediately for a complete dental examination and dental cleaning. Your dentist and hygienist will get you back on track to good oral health.

-Keep Up The Routine. Flossing should be done daily but the time of day may vary. The important thing is to stay steady and follow the course over time.

-Use The Proper Tools. All dental floss or dental hygiene products are not made equal. There are a myriad of options available and you need to find what works best for your needs. For some it might be the standard dental floss while for others a floss holder may be necessary to get the job done. Keep trying different products until you find the one that will make you do an effective job on a regular basis.

Flossing Conclusion

Flossing is an important part of dental hygiene. There are alternatives, but nothing works quite as efficiently as flossing. Poor dental hygiene will eventually lead to periodontal disease and or tooth decay. Your dentist and hygienist can help you with your technique and let you know if you are doing it properly. Use your time wisely, make your hygiene habits efficient and effective. You will be pleasantly surprised at the improvements in your health!

 

Recent research has uncovered that humans from the stone age had healthier teeth than modern man. Even though dentistry was limited back then, it is believed thatCosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDS dietary factors helped stone age humans maintain their oral health. As man has evolved and industrialized our world it has changed many things including the way we eat.

As we went from a hunter society and began industrialized farming some 150 years ago, the makeup of our oral bacteria has changed slowly. With the introduction of processed sugars and flours to our diet, researchers have seen a dramatic decrease in the diversity of our oral bacteria. This has allowed cavity causing strains to dominate the oral cavity.

Research Study Findings

The research team examined 34 prehistoric skeletons from northern European human skeletons. They gathered the DNA for testing from calcified dental plaque that was found on the subjects teeth. They used these samples to enable them to analyze how the oral bacteria has changed from stone age times all the way up to modern human times. As human society has evolved, they were able to show a negative impact on our dental health.

Further research is now being undertaken to include other time periods to see what changes happened in those times as well.

How To Stop Periodontal Disease and Tooth Decay?

Maintaining healthy teeth and gums is not very difficult but it needs to become a habit and performed on a daily basis. Below are some tips to maintain good oral health:

-Brush Twice a Day – We should all strive to brush our teeth for a minimum of 2 times per day for 2-3 minutes each time. Preferably, following every meal but that is not always possible.

Dental Hygiene Marielaina Perrone DDS-Flossing – This is very important to reach those areas that brushing along cannot reach. Flossing regularly will lead to healthier checkups over your entire life.

-Use An Antibacterial Rinse – Another tool that can help reach areas that brushing and flossing cannot. Using a good rinse will also lower the numbers of harmful bacteria in the mouth thus decreasing chances of developing tooth decay and periodontal disease.

-Maintain regular dental visits - for a thorough dental examination and professional cleanings.

Conclusion

The important note to remember is to maintain good oral hygiene regimen along with regular visits to the dentist to keep your teeth and gums as healthy as possible. We live in a modern age with modern tools to combat anything that comes our way.

 

Maintaining a good bedtime oral hygiene routine is even more important than your daytime one. A lot can happen overnight while you are sleeping. Food debris and

Oral Health Marielaina Perrone DDS

Maintain Good Oral Health At Bedtime!

bacteria can wreak havoc on your teeth and gums during sleep time, when there is almost no saliva produced to wash away bacteria. Most of us have more time at night to properly clean our teeth, but wait until we are too tired to do so.  In a few easy steps, you can be assured of a clean mouth, and get a better night’s sleep.

Bedtime Oral Health Tips

1. Tooth brushing at Bedtime. Brushing your teeth before you go to bed at night helps protect against plaque buildup, tooth decay, and periodontal disease. If you are particularly susceptible to tooth decay and/or periodontal disease, it is recommended that you brush immediately after dinner, then again right before bedtime. The earlier you brush, the less likely you are to start snacking, less snacking will reduce food debris and decrease the likelihood of cavities.

2. Practice Proper Brushing Form. The best way to clean your teeth is to brush at an angle gently in short circling strokes. Brush the outer tooth surfaces first, then the inner tooth surfaces, followed by the chewing surfaces. To clean the backs of your front teeth, use the tip of the brush and stroke gently up and down. Get a separate brush (or even a specialized tongue cleaner) to clean your tongue, there is quite a bit more bacteria (as well as dead cells) on your tongue than your teeth, so don’t use the same brush for both.

3. Switch to an electric toothbrush. The rotating and oscillating movement of the electric toothbrush head removes plaque from your teeth more efficiently than a regular toothbrush. Be sure to choose an electric toothbrush that’s comfortable to hold, easy to use, and has the rotating-oscillating head.

Oral Health Marielaina Perrone DDS4. Do Not Just Brush – Floss Too! Flossing removes food particles and plaque buildup where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. If this debris stays on the teeth, bacteria will increase throughout the night and feed off them, produce acid, and break down enamel while you’re sleeping. Tartar can not be removed by flossing, but accumulation can be slowed down with good hygiene, and the proper rinses. Flossing before bedtime is essential if you want to decrease your chances of periodontal disease and tooth decay. Morning flossing is also recommended, especially if you’re prone to periodontal disease or tartar buildup.

5. Rinse with mouthwash. Mouthwash isn’t just for fresh breath — anti bacterial mouth rinses contain a variety of ingredients that strengthen teeth(fluoride), kill plaque bacteria (Listerine) , help treat certain oral health conditions (Chlorhexidine), or simply dissolve plaque and tartar, like Periogen. Rinsing with a mouthwash before bed will help keep your teeth free of plaque and tooth decay and your gums safe from gingivitis. Most commercial, over-the-counter mouthwashes are designed to mask bad breath, tend to dry your mouth, and they won’t do much to contribute to your oral health. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse  is the right one for you.

6. Be aware of teeth grinding, apnea, and snoring. If you experience worn tooth enamel, increased tooth sensitivity, or torn cheek tissue, you may be grinding your teeth (also called bruxism) while you sleep. Though dentists cannot stop you from grinding your teeth, they can make you a mouth guard that you can wear at night to protect your teeth from the effects of grinding. There are also appliances that can be made to help you with jaw repositioning to help you breathe easier, and stop snoring.

7. Use a Waterpik. A waterpik is an excellent tool to remove debris that we are unable to get to, massage and stimulate gum tissue, and cleanse a deeper periodontal pocket. You can also add your therapeutic mouthrinse or periogen to the waterpik, to place it where it is needed most.

8. Maintain Regular Dental Visits. Be sure to schedule regular dental examinations and professional cleanings. Your dentist and hygienist will help you keep your teeth clean and your gums healthy over the course of your lifetime. Remember, preventive care and maintenance are just as important for a healthy mouth as good daytime and nighttime oral hygiene.

 

Oral Health Conclusion

Dental hygiene must be maintained on a regular basis along with visits to the dentist for dental examinations and professional cleanings if you are to maintain a bright, healthy smile. Dental hygiene can not be left by the wayside just because we are tired. Make the time and effort to properly maintain your teeth, and you will be rewarded every morning with a beautiful smile!

 

Periodontal disease, comes in two forms gingivitis (reversible) and periodontitis (treatable but non reversible), is an infection of the gums caused by bacteria found in

Periodontal Disease Treatment Marielaina Perrone DDS

Good Oral Health Leads To Good Overall Health!

plaque. Recent studies have shown between 50-75% of people have some form of periodontal disease. More statistics show that approximately 30% of Americans are at an increased risk of developing periodontal disease due to genetic factors. These statistics show how much a health concern periodontal disease can be especially when you add in even more research showing periodontal disease links with systemic diseases.

Factors in Development of Periodontal Disease

-Poor Oral Hygiene.

-Tobacco Use.

-Medications.

-Teeth Grinding or Bruxism.

-Genetics.

-Poor Immune System

-Systemic disease.

The earliest and mildest stage of gum disease is gingivitis, where the gums redden and bleed easily. If not treated, inflammation of the tissue occurs, resulting in progression of  the disease to periodontitis. Gingivitis is characterized by receding gums, loose teeth, sores, sensitive gums, swollen gums, red or discolored gums, chronic bad breath, change in teeth alignment and teeth movement. The ultimate consequence of advanced periodontal disease is loss of teeth, which occurs when the tissue and bone supporting the tooth breaks down.

Periodontal disease was previously thought to affect only the teeth and gums, but researchers have discovered that periodontal disease influences the overall health and well-being of an individual. Research has shown that gum disease is a risk factor for many health conditions throughout the body. The gum disease causing bacteria that normally resides around the teeth can enter the blood stream and reach other organs and tissues in the body. Once there, the bacteria  release disease-causing agents that can lead to chronic inflammatory conditions that can include:

Diabetes Mellitus (or simply Diabetes)

Periodontal disease impairs the body’s ability to maintain blood sugar levels making you more prone to diabetes or making diabetic symptoms worse. On the other hand, diabetic patients are more likely to suffer from periodontal disease due to a weakened immune system, making it easier for them to catch infections, viruses, and exhibit delayed wound healing.

Stroke

According to scientific studies, gum disease increases the risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. A chronic infection of the gums can be directly related to an increased risk of reduced blood flow to the brain. Stroke and gum disease have similar risk factors and severe inflammation from periodontal disease increases the risks of having a stroke.

Las Vegas Cosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDSHeart Disease

Having periodontal disease puts you at higher risks of heart disease. Just like periodontal disease, heart disease is a chronic inflammatory disease which can be greatly impacted by periodontal disease. The more severe the periodontal infection, the higher the risk of developing heart conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and acute coronary syndrome.

Respiratory Infections

When the bacteria in the plaque that causes gum disease goes to the lungs, it can cause respiratory diseases such as pneumonia. This explains the increased cases of pneumonia and other respiratory conditions in people with periodontal disease. This also is in conjunction with patients with lowered immune systems which makes it easier for them to be susceptible to these bacterial attacks.

Cancer

After considering risk factors for cancer including age, diabetes, smoking, BMI and more, experts found periodontal disease as a risk factor for lung, kidney, pancreatic, head, neck and hematologic cancers. Inflammation caused by periodontal disease is a major contributing factor to these cancers.

Bad Breath (Halitosis)

Periodontal disease can result in chronic bad breath which is more of a social issue than a medical one. Bacteria deposits on the tongue can also cause bad breath. This is one of the few conditions caused by periodontal disease that can be treated at home by practicing proper dental care to control halitosis (brushing, flossing, mouthrinses, tongue scraping).

Complications with Birth and Pregnancy

Periodontal disease in pregnant mothers has been shown to increase the risk of premature delivery and low birth weight. The  periodontal bacteria involved cause inflammation of the uterus and cervix. Periodontal disease also increases the risk of developing preeclampsia, a condition characterized by high blood pressure and excess protein.

Las Vegas Cosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDS

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a painful chronic inflammatory disease that affects the joints. The relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease goes both ways as each increases inflammation in the other. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are faced with increased risks and severity of periodontal disease and treating periodontal disease can relieve some of the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Conclusion

The best and easiest way to prevent and control periodontal disease is by maintaining a good oral hygiene program which includes regular dental visits as well as diligent at home care. This includes brushing, flossing, use of mouth rinse, and tongue scraping. Your health is important, taking care of your dental health is a great way to start taking care of your overall health.