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Receding gum tissue can be an issue especially as we get older. Normal healthy gum tissue will follow snugly against the conforms of our teeth. Gum recession occurs when the gum tissue recedes or pulls away from teeth exposing the root below. This creates an esthetic issue as well as a functional one. The roots of our teeth do not have a protective layer of enamel. This can make your teeth sensitive to hot and cold as well as increase your risk of tooth decay. Once recession occurs, this tissue cannot grow back to its original state. There are treatments to restore lost gum tissue and bring your smile back to its original healthy state.

What Causes Gum Tissue To Recede?

Several factors can cause our gum tissue to recede including:

-Periodontal Disease (ranges from ginigivitis to advanced periodontitis) - Periodontal disease (also called gum disease), refers infections of the structures around the teeth, which include the gums, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. In the earliest stage of periodontal disease — gingivitis — the infection affects the gums. In more severe forms of the disease, all of the tissues are involved. This inflammation occurs due to an accumulation of bacterial deposits called plaque.

Contributing factors of periodontal disease include:

-poor oral hygiene maintenance

-misaligned or crooked teeth

-damaged or faulty fillings

-bridges or partial dentures that no longer fit

-genetics

-hormonal changes due to pregnancy or oral contraceptives

-medications that cause dry mouth (xerostomia)

-certain immune disorders

-stress

-tobacco use

Periodontal Disease Stages

-Gingivitis causes gum redness, swelling, and sometimes bleeding. If left untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis.

Periodontitis is the advanced stage of periodontal disease and can cause the gums to recede. As the gum and connective tissues pull away from the tooth, a pocket forms between the tooth and gum, which begins to accumulate bacteria. Over time, the bacteria cause further damage and inflammation. If the gums recede too much, it may lead to bone loss, which can cause teeth to loosen or fall out over time.

Is Incorrect Brushing The Cause?

Maintaining a regular brushing and flossing regimen is essential for maintaining good oral hygiene. However, using an incorrect brushing technique could actually contribute to receding gums. The part of the gum that comes into contact with the crown of the tooth is called the gingival margin. Brushing incorrectly or too hard can damage the gingival margin, possibly triggering gum inflammation and recession.

Incorrect brushing techniques can include:

-brushing too forcefully

-using a hard or medium bristled toothbrush

-brushing the teeth in a broad, horizontal motion

Teeth grinding and clenching

Some people grind their teeth together while sleeping. This motion of teeth grinding puts intense pressure on the gums, which can cause them to react by receding over time. Teeth grinding can also cause teeth to become loose in their sockets. Grinding creates deep pockets between the tooth and the gum, where bacteria can collect. These bacteria trigger gum inflammation, which can then worsen gum recession.

Injury

Sustaining direct trauma to the gum tissue may cause the gums to recede in that area. These injuries could include:

-during a fall or other accident

-during dental procedures

-while wearing ill fitting partial dentures

-trauma while playing contact sports

Treatments For Receding Gums

Scaling and root planing

Scaling and root planing is one of the first treatments for receding gums that a dentist will recommend. This procedure will remove plaque and tartar from below the gumline, where routine brushing cannot reach. Root planing removes plaque and tartar specifically from the roots of teeth. Following removal of plaque and tartar your dentist or hygienist will use special instruments to smooth the roots, which helps the gums re-attach to the tooth.

Gum Tissue Grafting

Your dentist may recommend gum graft surgery if your gums have severely receded to the point where surgical intervention is needed. During gum grafting, a surgeon will take a small piece of gum tissue from a different area in the mouth and transplant it to cover the exposed tooth roots. This gum tissue grafting helps prevent bone loss and the gums from receding farther. It can also protect the previously exposed tooth roots from decay and tooth sensitivity

Pinhole Surgical Technique

Pinhole surgical technique is a fairly new treatment for mild to moderate receding gums. Pinhole Surgical Technique is a minimally invasive procedure that requires no incisions and no suturing. It is a quick and effective treatment for gum recession that is virtually pain-free and requires only a very short recovery time. Patients can resume normal activities the same day as their procedure.

Prevention Of Gum Tissue Recession

-Practice good oral hygiene

The following oral hygiene tips can help avoid receding gum tissue:

-flossing between the teeth at least once per day preferably after each meal

-fluoride toothpaste

-brushing your teeth 2x/day using a soft bristled toothbrush

-using an antiseptic mouthwash to reduce bacteria and flush out debris

-choosing a size and shape of toothbrush that allows access to all parts of the mouth

-replacing toothbrushes at least every 2–4 months or as recommended by your dentist

-maintaining a regular schedule of dental appointments

-Wear A Mouthguard

Wearing a mouthguard at night can help prevent gum recession due to teeth grinding. Mouthguards create an even pressure across the jaw and act as a physical barrier to separate the top and bottom teeth. Mouthguards can be bought at your local pharmacy. A dentist can also make a customized mouthguard, which will provide a better fit and be much more comfortable and long lasting

-Replace Dentures That Do Not Fit

Partial dentures that once fit well can become incompatible with the mouth over time. This can happen for several reasons, including:

-the bone and gum ridges shrinking over time

-differences or changes in jaw alignment

-overall wear and tear of the partial dentures over time

Ill fitting partial dentures can rub and irritate the gums, causing the gums to recede around healthy teeth. People can prevent this by replacing partial dentures as needed. If you are concerned have your dentist evaluate your partial dentures at your next visit.

-Maintain Regular Dental Visits

Attending regular dental checkups is vital for detecting the early stages of gum recession. Routine examinations also allow your dentist to identify and replace any failing restorations or ill fitting partial dentures, which can contribute to receding gums.

Gum Recession Conclusion

Unfortunately once the gum tissues have receded, they cannot grow back on their own. With Advancements on treatment your dentist can reattach and restore gum tissue around the teeth. Remember to maintain a good oral hygiene program at home and seeing your dentist regularly can help prevent, slow, or stop gum recession. If you notice changes in your smile speak to your dentist to see what options are right for you.




Diabetes (also called diabetes mellitus) is a chronic systemic disease which affects your body’s ability to process sugars in your food. As a result, a diabetic patient will have a high blood glucose (sugar) level which can cause a host of issues including problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, and heart. Diabetes can also lower your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. Diabetes can also affect your oral health in many different ways.

Fast Facts About Diabetes

-Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels.

-Diabetes currently affects over 371 million people worldwide and is expected to affect over 550 million by the year 2030. In the United States, a new case of diabetes is diagnosed once every 30 seconds and more than 1.9 million new cases are diagnosed each year.

Types Of Diabetes

-Type 1 Diabetes – In this type, the body does not produce insulin. About 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1.

-Type 2 Diabetes – In this type, the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. About 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type.

-Gestational Diabetes – In this type, pregnant females are affected

Common Diabetes Symptoms

1) Frequent need to urinate (polyuria)

2) Intense thirst (polydipsia) and hunger (polyphagia)

3) Unexpalined weight gain

4) Unusual weight loss

5) Fatigue (tiredness)

6) Cuts and bruises that do not heal

7) Male sexual dysfunction

8) Numbness and tingling in hands and feet

-If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life with little to no complications.

-Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels.

-As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly.

-As smoking might have a serious effect on cardiovascular health, diabetics should stop smoking.

-Hypoglycemia – low blood glucose – can have a bad effect on the patient.

-Hyperglycemia – high blood glucose – can also have a bad effect on the patient.

How Is Your Dental Health Affected By Diabetes?

-Periodontal Disease. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection, diabetics have an increased risk for developing gingivitis (earliest and most treatable form of periodontal disease), an inflammation usually caused by the presence of bacteria in plaque. Plaque is the sticky film that accumulates on teeth both above and below the gum line. Without regular dental check-ups, periodontal disease may progress if left untreated. It also can cause inflammation and destruction of tissues surrounding and supporting teeth, gums, bone and fibers that hold the gums to the teeth. Research has shown that treating periodontal disease in people with diabetes can help improve blood sugar control.

-Burning Mouth SyndromeBurning mouth syndrome is a chronic burning in the mouth without an obvious cause. The discomfort can affect your tongue, gums, lips, inside of your cheeks, roof of your mouth or widespread areas of your oral cavity. Burning mouth syndrome appears suddenly and can be severe, as if you burned your mouth.

-Fungal infections (such as thrush and oral candidiasis). Since diabetes weakens your immune system, you may be prone to developing fungal infections. Symptoms include painful sores and difficulty swallowing. If you develop a fungal infection, it is important to see your dentist as soon as possible.

-Dry mouth (xerostomia). Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease salivary flow, which can result in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, oral ulcers, oral infections, and increased incidence of tooth decay.

-Infection and delayed healing. People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be impaired.

Dental Care Tips For Diabetic Patients

-Maintain Good Blood Sugar Levels.

-Keep your healthcare team informed including your dentist.

-See your dentist regularly for dental hygiene visits as well as oral examinations. It is recommended that you visit your dentist and hygienist at least every 6 months. For many diabetic patients, it is advised that they go on a more frequent schedule to maintain proper oral health.

-Brush and Floss Daily. This is to prevent plaque build up and keep periodontal disease away. In fact, it is recommended that diabetic patients brush following every meal to ensure good dental hygiene.

-Denture wearers should remove their dentures and clean them daily. Do not sleep in them.

-If you smoke, talk to your doctor about ways to quit.

-Maintain regular visits to your diabetes doctor to ensure there are no conflicts between dental treatment and your general treatment.

-Remember that healing may take longer in people with diabetes. Follow your dentist‘s post-treatment instructions closely.

-Patients with diabetes with orthodontic appliances should contact their orthodontist immediately if a wire or bracket results in a cut to their tongue or mouth.

Conclusion

Diabetes can be a scary diagnosis but with proper monitoring and care it does not have to be. A well controlled diabetic can leave a very normal life and stay healthy for a long, long time. Dental care should never be compromised even for healthy individuals.

 


Periodontal disease is a slow moving, progressive dental disease that can slowly sneak up on us. Many ignore the warning signs simply because many of them are painless. It is important to recognize these warning signs and symptoms as periodontal disease is the leading cause of tooth loss. There are many different types of periodontal disease including aggressive, chronic, necrotizing periodontitis, and periodontitis associated with systemic diseases.  Each of these types of periodontal disease has its own distinct characteristics and symptoms, and all require prompt treatment by a dentist to help halt subsequent bone and gum tissue loss.

Common Periodontal Disease Signs And Symptoms

-Bleeding Upon Brushing, Flossing, Or Eating. This is one of the most common signs that periodontal disease is active. It is often also one of the most overlooked signs. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease. As the bacteria and toxins build up in the mouth, the body responds by activating the inflammatory process, rushing our cells to stop the attack. This will cause the gum tissues to become inflamed and red. It is important to note that bleeding gums can also be something more sinister like leukemia and blood platelet disorders.

-Unexplained Pain Or Swelling. This can be caused by a periodontal infection. At this point it is essential that you get to a dentist as soon as possible. If the infection is left unchecked it will cause damage to the gum tissues and the bone supporting your teeth. It can also be carried to other parts of the body through the blood stream.

-Persistent Bad Breath (Halitosis). Bad breath can occur from many things but peristent bad breath can mean progressive periodontal disease . As the gum tissues are destroyed, the areas where the oral bacteria can flourish will increase causing a foul odor in the mouth. There are other causes of chronic halitosis that should also be ruled out.

-Change In Your Smile Or Loose Teeth. As periodontal disease advances, your teeth will loosen and shift out of position. This will effect the way your teeth fit together and even alter your smile.

-Teeth Become Longer In Appearance. As periodontal disease progresses it will lead to destruction of the bone and gum tissues. This will show up as gum recession. Once the gum tissues pull back they expose more of the tooth and root, making them appear longer than before.

-Pus Drainage. This goes along with the periodontal infection mentioned previously. An active periodontal infection will create pus which can ooze out from between the teeth and gums causing a bad taste and malodor.

Avoiding Periodontal Disease

Dental and Periodontal Examinations

Your dentist will complete a thorough examination with x-rays and periodontal charting. Notations about the visual condition of the gum tissue will also be recorded. In its earliest stages the gum tissue is usually red, puffy, and painless or slightly tender at this point. Plaque and tartar will more than likely be present to some degree. A periodontal probe will be used to measure around the teeth to see if your periodontal disease has progressed and to what degree. It is important to note that once bone loss has occurred you now have a more advanced form of periodontal disease.

Following the examination, your dentist will recommend a course of treatment for your periodontal disease. This will include a professional cleaning along with extra home care instructions. The goal in treatment is to reduce the inflammation and not allow progression of the disease. An antibacterial rinse (example, Listerine) may also be recommended for at home use. Your dentist may also recommend repair of misaligned or crooked teeth to aid you in your home care efforts. Your dentist may also recommend a more frequent schedule(every 4-6 months) to control your periodontal disease.

Following removal of plaque and tartar, bleeding and tenderness of the gums should begin to subside within 1-2 weeks after professional cleaning and careful dental hygiene. Warm salt water or antibacterial rinses can also reduce gum inflammation. Taking an over the counter anti inflammatory medication can also aid in pain and inflammation reduction.

Healthy gums should look pink and firm with no bleeding upon brushing, flossing, or eating. Good oral hygiene must be maintained for your whole life, or periodontal disease will come back and possibly advance past the gingivitis form into advanced periodontal disease (also called periodontitis).

Steps to prevent periodontal disease should include:

-Routine dental visits. Usually recommended every 3- 6 months for examination and professional cleaning.

-Brushing after every meal and flossing at least once a day.

-Rinsing with an antiseptic rinse as recommended by your dentist.

Consult your physician if the bleeding is severe or chronic, gums continue to bleed even after dental treatment, or you have other unexplained symptoms along with the bleeding from your gums. These could all be the sign of a more serious condition than periodontal disease and should be checked out as soon as possible.

Periodontal Disease Conclusion

Periodontal Disease in its beginning stage is very treatable and should be easily controlled. Keeping periodontal disease from progressing to more advanced stages should be your goal. It takes a regular effort by both you and your dentist but it can be done. Getting control of periodontal disease will not only help your overall health, but will keep you smiling!

Are you planning a romantic evening with your loved one for Valentine’s Day?  When you know that you are going to be up close to someone you care about, fresh breath is important. Below you will find the best tips to maintain fresh breath for your valentine, and every day of the year.

Top Breath Freshening Tips

-Keep Hydrated. Water has a dual purpose in maintaining dental health. It can wash away bacteria and food particles that can lead to bad breath and also keep  tissues hydrated which reduces the buildup of malodorous sulfur compounds on the back of the tongue. Another good beverage for fresh breath is green tea. Green tea has an increased ability to lower the levels of oral bacteria’s sulfur compounds. These sulfur compounds are the cause of many oral malodors which can linger for hours.

-Chew Sugarless Gum (even better with Xylitol). Chewing gum with xylitol can stimulate salivary production and clean our teeth. Xylitol is a natural sweetener derived from the fibrous parts of plants. It does not break down like sugar and can help keep a neutral pH level in the mouth. Xylitol also prevents bacteria from sticking to the teeth.  The number of acid-producing bacteria may fall as much as 90% when chewing gum with xylitol. A decrease in plaque will result in a decrease in odor.

-Maintain A Balanced Diet Filled With The Right Foods. Enjoying crunchy, high-fiber foods like apples and raw vegetables can increase your mouth’s production of saliva, which will diminish odor-causing bacteria. Cinnamon has been shown to kill odor causing bacteria. Vitamin C-rich foods stop odor-causing bacteria from spreading and neutralize odors from stinky foods like garlic and onions. Greek yogurt lowers a waste product from bacteria called hydrogen sulfide in the mouth. Chewing fresh parsley can also help your breath.

-Do Not Avoid Carbohydrates. The latest diets, like the Atkins Diet, require you to eat little to no carbohydrates. If you are eating a mostly protein diet, your body could go into a state of ketosis. Ketosis is when your body burns fats for energy and produces molecules called ketones. A type of ketone called acetone is then excreted in the breath, and can be described as smelling “fruity” or “rotten.” To avoid ketosis, eat a moderate amount of healthy carbohydrates, such as whole-grain breads, rice or pasta.

-Use An Anti Bacterial Mouthrinse Or Spray. Mouth rinses have many great qualities like reducing plaque buildup on teeth and helping to prevent periodontal disease. They also are able to keep breath fresh. Use a mouth rinse at least once a day will help keep the number of odor causing bacteria down to a minimum. There are also breath sprays, Closys is a great oral spray which directly neutralizes sulfur compounds.

Fresh Breath Conclusion

Maintaining fresh breath should be a goal year round and not just for Valentine’s day. Taking a few extra steps can help give you the confidence you need in intimate moments. If your bad breath persists please seek the help of a dentist to ensure the cause is not a more serious health condition.