Family & Cosmetic Care in a Comfortable, Relaxed Environment.

Serving Las Vegas and Henderson, Nevada since 1999.

 

The new year is fast approaching and it may be time to start thinking about what your New Year’s resolutions should be. These usually include losing weight,

Have A Healthy, Happy New Year!!

striving for a better job, or maybe even just being  a better friend or partner. Many people also set new goals for leading a healthier life going forward. So why not make some New Year’s resolutions regarding your dental health?

Making dental health resolutions can keep your teeth healthy, and studies have shown it can keep your entire body healthy as well.

Dental Health New Year’s Resolutions

Eat A Well Balanced Diet including Fruits and Vegetables

Eating a well balanced diet is important for yourdental health. If your body is not getting its propernutrition it can affect your entire immune system. Poor nutrition, increases susceptibility to many common oral disorders, including periodontal disease and tooth decay. Antioxidants and other nutrients found in fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts improve your body’s ability to fight bacteria and inflammation. Healthy eating helps to protect your teeth and gum tissues. In addition, crisp fruits and raw vegetables like apples, carrots and celery can actually help clean plaque from teeth and freshen breath as well.

Quit Smoking or Using Other Tobacco Products

Using tobacco has been proven to be bad for your dental health as well as your general health. Some of the dental issues associated with smoking include:

-Tooth Discoloration.

-Tooth Decay.

-Gingival Recession.

-Periodontal Disease.

-Increased risk for cancer. This includes oral cancer as well throat, lung, and other systemic cancers.
People who smoke are almost twice as likely to lose their teeth as non smokers. It is not just smoking tobacco that has negative effects on your oral health: use of smokeless tobacco can be just as damaging to your dental health. The good news is, that the risk of tooth loss decreases after you quit smoking or using smokeless tobacco.

Use Alcohol in Moderation

You may already know that excessive alcohol intake can have an effect on your overall health, but did you know that it may also affect your dental health? According to the Academy of General Dentistry, those who use tobacco products, are more likely to maintain poor nutrition. Drinking excessive alcohol also  increases gum recession (periodontal pocketing). Studies show that smokers who regularly drink alcohol are less likely to brush and floss their teeth regularly and are less concerned about their basic health than non smokers.

Improve Dental Hygiene: Brush and Floss Regularly

Brushing and flossing protect your teeth from tooth decay and periodontal disease. These are caused by your teeth’s most persistent enemy, plaque. Both brushing and flossing are equally important for good oral health. Studies have shown that only flossing can remove plaque from between teeth and below the gum line,areas  where tooth decay and periodontal diseasebegins.

Without proper brushing and flossing, you may develop bleeding gums and gingivitis. Gingivitis is the earliest form of periodontal disease and is reversible. If untreated it will worsen to severely swollen, red, bleeding gums and, eventually, advanced periodontal disease. Periodontal disease has been linked to your general health, therefore, it is doubly important to maintain good dental health at all times.

See Your Dentist for Regular Examinations and Cleanings

By seeing your dentist at least twice a year for dental examinations and cleanings, you can help prevent any dental health issues before they cause pain or require more comprehensive or expensive treatment. Regular visits allow your dentist to keep track of your oral health and recommend an individualized dental hygiene maintenance regimen to address areas of concern.

Happy New Year!!

For the new year and for years to come you should resolve to improve your health, dental hygiene habits, quit smoking, drink in moderation, and improve your overall diet. Your teeth and body, and loved ones will thank you for it for many years to come!  Bring in the new year with a smile!

Birth control is a part of many women’s lives. The newer method of receiving a birth control shot DMPA) every 3 months vs taking a pill every day has become a convenient way of  birth control  for many women.

Depo-Provera is the most well known and used DPMA. This contraceptive is injected into a woman’s muscle every three months.

DMPA works to prevent pregnancy in three different ways:

1) Prevents ovaries from releasing eggs.

2) Thickens cervical mucus to act as a barrier preventing sperm from reaching the egg.

3) Changes the lining of the uterus to prevent implantation.

Birth Control Study Findings

New studies have shown, that there are some dental health risks involved with the DMPA shot. The study has found a possible link between injectable progesterone contraceptives (Depotmedrooxyprogesterone acetate-DMPA) and periodontal disease.

The researchers examined about 4,500 participants ranging in age from 15 to 44. These patients were confirmed to not be pregnant and all reported receiving DMPA shots in the past or never having received the contraceptive shot.

About 4% of the  research participants were currently using the  Depo Provera shot, and about 12% had used it in the past. All the participants were thoroughly examined by a dentist. The dentist recorded gum tissue health indicators, such as  presence of bleeding gums,  any gingival recession, as well as  periodontal probing to measure bone levels surrounding the teeth.

Bone loss, periodontal pockets, and gingival recession are hallmark signs of periodontal disease.

Birth Control Marielaina Perrone DDSResearchers found that those currently taking DMPA injections were about 73% more likely to have gingivitis,( Gum inflammation and bleeding, without periodontal bone loss). Those women who had previously used DMPA also had a slightly higher incidence of gingivitis but the level of risk was not significant enough to prove an association.The researchers also found that Hispanic and Black women were 30-50% more likely to have some form of periodontal disease. Women of lower economic levels or who had not visited the dentist within the past two years also had a higher rate of periodontal disease.

The researchers believe that the hormones played a major role in the presence of periodontal disease. Women receiving any hormone based contraceptive (like DMPA) injections need to pay extra  attention to their teeth and gums to help prevent periodontal disease. This should include regular dental visits along with professional cleanings every 3-6 months.

Periodontal Disease Impacts your Whole Body

This research has once again shown, a definite link between periodontal disease and your overall health. When your mouth becomes diseased it does not remain contained there. When periodontal disease advances, toxins are released into your bloodstream. These toxins promote inflammation and can have a negative impact on your heart and other organs. This combination of bacteria and inflammation has been linked to a number of chronic diseases. These include:

-Heart Disease. People with periodontal disease are actually almost twice as likely to have heart disease.

-Diabetes. Periodontal disease is considered a definite complication of diabetes. Patients with diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease than those without. According to the Journal of Periodontology, not only does having diabetes increase the risk of periodontal disease but it also increases blood sugar which will lead to  diabetic complications including problems with healing.

-Rheumatoid Arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease are both chronic inflammatory processes. It has been found that treating periodontal disease has reduced the effects of rheumatoid arthritis.

-Cancer. Periodontal disease has been linked to several different cancers including pancreatic, kidney, and blood cancers.

-Other disease links include Alzheimer’s Disease, Kidney Disease, Respiratory Disease, Pregnancy complications (premature birth and low birth weight), and Osteoporosis.

What to Do If You Take a Progesterone Contraceptive?

See your dentist more often, ( every 3-4 months) and amp up your home care. More frequent cleanings, and flossing after meals will help prevent complications and the advancement of periodontal disease. The sooner the problem is detected, the better your chances are at reversing the disease process through professional cleanings and proper oral hygiene. If periodontal disease progresses it can be treated. Most often,  a deeper cleaning called scaling and root planing will start the healing process. In more severe cases,  periodontal disease surgery may be required. Remember to ask your dentist and hygienist for better brushing and flossing techniques, and ask them how often you should be seen for cleanings.

 

Is the sipping of hot coffee or the eating of cold ice cream sometimes a painful experience for you? If your answer is YES, you may have a common problem called sensitive teeth.

Tooth sensitivity is tooth or teeth discomfort that is provoked by hot, cold, sweet, or acidic foods and drinks, or breathing in cold air. The pain can be sudden, sharp, and shoot deep into the nerve endings of your teeth.

There are two very different types of sensitivity:

Dentinal Sensitivity. This occurs when the middle layer (dentin) of a tooth is exposed to the outside. Dentin is usually covered by enamel above the gum line and by cementum (bone like connective tissue covering the root of a tooth) below the gum line. There are tiny openings called tubules in the dentin. Inside each tubule there is a nerve branch that comes from the tooth’s pulp (the nerve center of the tooth). When the dentin is exposed, these nerve branches can be affected by hot, cold, or certain foods. This causes tooth sensitivity.

When the outer protective layers of enamel or cementum wear away the dentin becomes exposed to the outside. This can affect one tooth or multiple teeth. Dentin exposure can be be caused in a variety of ways. These can include:

1. Aggressive brushing. The enamel layer can be worn away from brushing too hard.

2. Plaque build up. The presence of plaque on the root surfaces can cause sensitivity.

3. Tooth wear that occurs over time from chewing and brushing.

4. Untreated dental cavities.

5. Gingival recession. When the gums recede they expose the tooth’s roots. Receding gums often are caused by periodontal diseases or by aggressive brushing. Receded gums are very common and up to four fifths of people have gum recession by the time they are 65.

6. Periodontal surgery (gum surgery) that exposes the tooth’s roots.

7.  Tooth whitening.

8. Frequently eating acidic foods or liquids.

Pulpal sensitivity. This is a reaction of the tooth’s pulp. The pulp consists of a mass of blood vessels and nerves in the center of each tooth. Sensitivity of the pulpal tissue tends to affect only one tooth. Causes of this type of sensitivity can include:

1. Dental cavities or infection.

2. Placement of a recent filling.

3. Excessive pressure from grinding or clenching your teeth.

4. A cracked or broken tooth.

If you feel a sharp pain upon biting, you may have a broken or cracked filling. Pain when you release your bite is a sign of a cracked tooth.

sensitive teeth

toothpaste for sensitive teeth

You dentist will be able to diagnose the type of sensitivity you have. You want to rule out pulpal sensitivity as that requires more extensive treatment. If it is decided you have dentinal sensitivity then we will suggest a few options for you. The most conservative way is by use of a sensitivity toothpaste. I recommend Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief which I believe to be the best on the market today. I have found it to be the most effective in eliminating or limiting the symptoms of tooth sensitivity. Other options include use of a fluoride varnish or a bonded desensitizing agent that we would apply in office. As well as use of an at home fluoride rinse.

In severe cases of hypersensitivity that is persistent and cannot be treated by other ways, your dentist may recommend endodontic (root canal therapy) treatment to eliminate the sensitive teeth issue.

If you or a loved one is experiencing either type of sensitivity, the best approach would be to schedule a dental appointment for further evaluation.