Family & Cosmetic Dental Care in a Relaxed Environment.

Exceptional Dentistry Las Vegas and Henderson NV Since 1999.

Dental Implants, Teeth Whitening, Porcelain Veneers, &
Botox Cosmetic.

Porcelain crowns have been a staple in cosmetic dentistry for years. It gives the dentist and patient a much more aesthetic appearance as a final product. In the past crowns and bridges were traditionally made of porcelain fused to metal (PFM). With the development of modern porcelain, which are incredibly strong and reflect light similar to natural teeth, full porcelain crowns can be used in most areas in which porcelain fused to metal crowns were used. This is especially true in a cosmetic area of the mouth.

Porcelain crowns are very versatile and used in many ways. The cosmetic enhancement use of porcelain crowns include, changing color of teeth, closing gaps between teeth, fixing teeth that are crooked or crowded, changing shape or size of teeth. Porcelain crowns are also used to cover and protect damaged teeth, (tooth that has a root canal, broken, cracked, large fillings), and to act as a new tooth in the case of dental implants. Their versatility gives the dentist 89014 a greater flexibility in using them to fix potential issues for the patient.

cosmetic dentist emax crown

Emax Porcelain Crowns

The first step often times includes impressions for study models and photos. The patient and dentist can then discuss and plan what the end result should be. The treatment includes preparation of the tooth surface for the porcelain crowns. The outer enamel and sometimes a bit of  the dentin are removed. This allows room for the porcelain crowns to fit over the teeth and be in perfect cosmetic alignment with the others. Impressions are taken of the newly reshaped teeth and temporary crowns are made.  The porcelain crowns are custom made in the dental laboratory. The porcelain crowns are then cemented or bonded onto the teeth using an adhesive bonding material. The placement of the porcelain crown will normally take about 30 minutes (depends on amount of porcelain crowns being placed). Once completed,  the patient can eat normally and enjoy the benefits of a beautiful new porcelain crown that matches and blends perfectly with the patients existing teeth. Only you and the dentist should know anything was done.

Advantages of All Porcelain Crowns

-No PFM gray or black lines at the Gum Line of Teeth. You may have noticed a person with a dark line in the gum area along a PFM crown edge. With PFM crowns, the soft tissue around the tooth can recede over time. This allows a reveal of the metal framework underneath. This cannot happen with an all porcelain crowns because they are metal free.

-Perfect Fit. Porcelain crowns are created in state of the art facilities. Porcelain crowns will fit so well you will even forget they are present.

-Cosmetically Perfect Match. All porcelain crowns have the ability with modern porcelains to match your existing shade of tooth color as well as mimic the light reflecting properties of your natural teeth. Porcelain crowns will be undetectable to anyone but you and your dentist. Dental porcelain can be shaped custom colored and sculpted to closely copy the look of your own natural tooth enamel. All the while providing the desired strength and resilience.

Some disadvantages of an all porcelain crowns:

-Higher cost over traditional PFM crowns.

-Durability. While porcelain crowns are very durable, they do not have the flexibility of natural teeth, they can fracture. Avoiding certain foods may be necessary. For example, Biting into sandwich with a hard bread. Patients who grind and clench their teeth will need to be fitted with a mouth guard to protect the porcelain crown from unnecessary and excessive pressures.

-Porcelain crowns may need a bit more reduction of tooth structure than traditional PFM crowns.

-Sensitivity may happen for a short time, (hot, cold sensitivity), especially with bonded porcelain crowns.

Follow-up Maintenance of All Porcelain Crowns

The maintenance of porcelain crowns is actually very easy.  They require routine brushing with non-abrasive fluoride toothpaste and regular flossing as well as regular visits to the dentist. A follow-up appointment will be scheduled to evaluate the porcelain crowns about 2-4 weeks after they are placed in the mouth This allows the dentist to review the work with tissues all healed and see how your oral tissues are reacting to the crowns. Even if you think the crowns are successful, this appointment is an important part of your future oral health.
There are several types of all porcelain crowns generally used in dental offices today. They have all proven to give the best cosmetic dental results.
-Zirconia Crowns or Lava Crowns (made by 3M Espe). This type of all porcelain crowns are made out of a zirconium core with porcelain pressed or layered over the crown to follow the natural contours of teeth. These crowns offer good strength and durability. Due to great strength, the material can be used to make a bridge.
-Procera Crowns (made by Nobel Biocare). These are made of an Alumina core with porcelain pressed or layered over the crown to follow the natural contours of the teeth. These crowns offer great strength and durability and are esthetically quite beautiful. Often used in the back of the mouth, (premolars, molars), these are cemented in with traditional cement and have less post-placement sensitivity.
-Empress II Crowns (made by Ivoclar Vivadent).These highly cosmetic porcelain crowns are used in the front of the mouth. They are used mostly for cosmetics, are very beautiful, but can fracture.
-eMAX Crowns or IPS e.MAX Crowns (made by Ivoclar Vivadent). These porcelain crowns are entirely made out of porcelain without a underlying framework. The absence of this framework offers a great advantage over Zirconia crowns, Lava crowns and Procera crowns in that e.MAX crowns allow for more light transmission through the crown translating to a more superior cosmetic dental result. The strength of these porcelain crowns is such that they can be used in any area of the mouth, can be made thinner than most porcelains, and can be used for an implant without much worry of fracture.
Cosmetic Dentistry is the art and science of creating a beautiful smile. The all porcelain crowns are just one more tool that the dentist can use to give you that smile you’ve always dreamed of.
Procera Porcelain CrownsLava Crowns Ivoclar VivadentPorcelain Crowns 3M Espe

 

 

Xray showing swallowed Tongue Piercing

Radiograph Showing Swallowed Piercing

Tongue Piercing dangers. It is very hard to believe or understand how certain things ever become popular. But they do like, pet rocks, 8 track tapes, and the rubik’s cube. Fortunately over time, these fads fade away into oblivion. The latest craze over the last few years has been tongue piercing. Tongue Piercing has become very popular, especially among teenagers and young adults. Most people generally believe that tongue piercing is a safe and fun way for young people to express themselves, similar to piercing our ears. Unfortunately, tongue piercing can cause significant damage to our teeth as well as risks to our general health. According to one study, 16% of the females and 4% of the males at a prominent U.S. University had a tongue piercing. The tongue piercing fad may come and go, but for people with pierced tongues, the adverse effects could last a lifetime. Tongue piercing can result in chipped or broken teeth, infections, gum and nerve damage, excessive drooling, taste sensation loss, and tooth loss. Irritation from the jewelry can cause periodontal disease or even oral cancer. So for a teenager or young adult, it may seem cool but damaged and missing teeth, infection, and life threatening cancer are far from cool.

Approximately 45-50% of people who have worn tongue jewelry for four or more years have chipped or fractured their teeth. This damage can eventually send people to the dentist for fillings, crowns, root canal therapy, or even extractions. Because tongue jewelry from a tongue piercing can break or chip teeth, people wearing this jewelry may have to spend thousands of dollars on dental work to regain the smile they will want and desire later in life .

Infection

Tongue Piercing Infection

Infection from tongue piercing

The tongue is covered with bacteria, and when pierced, that bacteria can get in the blood stream and underlying tongue tissues. This can cause a serious infection. Unfortunately, tongue piercing jewelry wearers may not be aware of a problem since the symptoms of infection, such as swelling, redness, and pain, are quite similar to the after effects of the piercing itself. Dentists are learning very quickly that oral infections can also lead to infections in other parts of the body. If you have certain health conditions like diabetes, heart disease, joint replacements or congenital heart conditions, you will be even more susceptible to developing infection.

Dentists have reported a rise in cases of Ludwig’s angina, a very severe infection of the floor of the mouth and jaws, in patients who have a tongue piercing. In Ludwig’s angina, the tongue may swell to the point that it constricts the airway causing breathing to be difficult.

Another condition afflicting patients with a tongue piercing is endocarditis, a disease which occurs when bacteria enters the blood stream and infects the heart valves while weakening them. This can occur in certain patients with underlying ( often undiagnosed and without symptoms) heart problems.

Oral Cancer

Patients with a tongue piercing may develop ulcers in the oral cavity from constant irritation. These ulcers can possibly progress to oral cancer. Precancerous ulcers can be detected during an oral cancer screening by your dentist. For patients with a tongue piercing, it is doubly important to see your dentist regularly. Especially one using the Velscope oral cancer screening system.

velscope

Velscope Oral Cancer Screening

Broken or Chipped Teeth

Fractured Tooth

Damage from Tongue Piercing

It is not uncommon to see perfectly healthy teeth chipped or fractured from a tongue piercing. People chip teeth on tongue piercings while eating, sleeping, talking and chewing on the jewelry. The fracture can be confined to the enamel of the tooth and require just a simple filling or it may go deeper into the tooth, which may require a root canal, tooth extraction, or crown. This can often happen when a person carelessly biting on the tongue jewelry during chewing or sleeping.

Allergic Reactions

Developing an allergic reaction is not uncommon depending on the type of metal the piercing is made of. Some types of tongue piercings are not high quality surgical grade stainless steel and a person can experience an allergic reaction even if they do not typically have metal allergies. Please be aware of the type of tongue piercing being placed before going ahead with it.

Disease Transmission

Oral and tongue piercings are a potential risk factor for the transmission of hepatitis B and C and herpes simplex virus.

Nerve Damage and Prolonged Bleeding

Numbness or loss of sensation at the site of the tongue piercing or movement problems can occur if nerves have been damaged during the piercing. Blood vessels can be punctured leading to prolonged bleeding.

Periodontal Disease

Tongue piercing casuing gingival recession

Gingival Recession Caused by Tongue Piercing

People with a tongue piercing have a increased risk of periodontal disease than those without a tongue piercing. The jewelry can come into contact with gingival tissue causing injury which can cause recession of the gum tissue ( and possibly bone loss). This can lead to loose teeth and tooth loss.

Difficulties in Daily Oral Functions and Possible Aspiration of Jewelry

Tongue piercing can result in difficulty in speaking clearly and annunciating properly. Chewing and swallowing food can also be a challenge. This is because the tongue piercing jewelry stimulates excessive salivary production. Temporary or permanent drooling is another consequence of increased saliva production. Altered taste can also be present. Jewelry that becomes loose in the mouth can become a choking hazard and, if swallowed, can result in injury to the digestive track or lungs.

Another problem that is of concern is that few standards for body piercers exist. Dental offices must follow strict guidelines (developed by OSHA and the CDC) for sterilization and infection control. Contaminated tools used in tongue piercing can expose people to an increased risk for serious infections like hepatitis and HIV.

If a person does decide to have his or her tongue pierced, they should know that it will take 4-6 weeks to heal and it may be very uncomfortable during that time. The piercer

Radiograph showing bone loss from piercing

Radiograph Showing Bone Loss Due to Tongue Piercing

will place a larger, starter barbell jewelry in the tongue to give it enough room to heal when the tongue swells. After the  swelling goes down, he or she should get a smaller barbell, which will be less likely to get in the way of teeth and more difficult to chew on.

If there are no complications, the barbell can be removed for short periods of time without the hole closing. Some dentists  suggest that to protect teeth patients should remove the barbell every time they eat, sleep or participate in a strenuous activity. There are also plugs available to place in the hole, so the jewelry can be removed for as long as needed.

You will need to keep the tongue piercing clean and use an antiseptic mouthwash (example Listerine) after every meal and brush the jewelry the same as you would your own teeth to remove any unseen plaque. See your dentist or doctor at first sign of infection or change to the area surrounding the piercing.

Most importantly, people with pierced tongues should see a dentist regularly to make sure tongue, surrounding tissues, and teeth stay healthy.

As we get older, our oral health becomes more important than ever. Maintaining proper oral hygiene is not just for your teeth and gums. Senior adults have unique dental needs and challenges. This includes a vital link between a person’s general health and their oral health. A healthy mouth makes all the difference in the world if you want to feel good, stay healthy, and look great throughout your life. By adopting healthy oral habits at home, seeking regular dental care, and making smart choices about diet and lifestyle, you will be well on your way to keeping your teeth strong and sparkling for a lifetime.

Across the United States, 10,000 adults reach senior age every day and the number is growing rapidly.  Bt age 65, statistics show that older adults are managing a minimum of two chronic conditions and are usually taking multiple medications. The taking of multiple medications increases their risk for dry mouth, which can quickly lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Untreated dental disease can result in pain, infection, poor nutrition, and lowered self esteem, all of which can have a very large impact on the quality of life.

A senior with good oral health not only makes it easier to eat nutritious foods, but it can also give you the confidence to smile, talk, and maintain a high self esteem. Research has shown seniors with good oral health are less likely to develop heart disease, strokes, or diabetes.

Certain dental health problems are more common in seniors, they include the following:

1) Tooth Cavities. Cavities are caused by plaque bacteria which breakdown the enamel and cause holes in the teeth. Soft diet, dry mouth, limited dexterity, a large number of crowns and fillings to clean around, and high sugars or acids in your diet will increase your chances of decay.

2) Periodontal Disease. Seniors are at higher risk of periodontal disease (gum disease). Gum disease occurs when plaque builds up beneath your gum line causing inflammation and bone loss. Certain medications cause the gums to swell and bleed and make it more difficult to remove plaque. This may cause gum recession and periodontal disease.

3) Root Cavities. The roots of the teeth can also decay. Once gums recede, the unprotected root surface is very easy for the plaque bacteria to attack. With no enamel to protect it, the cavity can progress rapidly to the nerve of the tooth.

4) Tooth Sensitivity. As we get older, our gums may recede, exposing root surfaces. The roots have nerve endings close to the surface which can become increasingly sensitive to hot, cold, brushing, and sweets. If you experience sensitivity, try a sensitivity toothpaste (like Colgate Sensitive Pro-Health) . If the problem persists, see your dentist, as the sensitivity may be an indication of a more serious condition, such as a cavity or a cracked or fractured tooth.

5) Dry mouth or Xerostomia. Dry mouth is a common condition in the senior population and one that may be caused by medications or certain medical disorders (like radiation therapy for cancer). If this condition is left untreated, it can cause damage to your teeth. Dry mouth occurs when there is reduced salivary flow. Plaque tends to build up when the mouth is dry, putting you at an increased risk for cavities. Your dentist can recommend multiple methods to restore moisture in your mouth, as well as treatments or medications to help prevent the development of cavities. Two products I recommend are Biotene and Listerine Zero.

6) Denture Issues. Many older people wear dentures. If they are not properly cared for, they can cause dental health problems, especially fungal infections such as yeast. A sign of a yeast infection is bright red irritated tissue, itchiness, burning, or a white creamy build up on oral tissues or denture. Just because you have dentures does not mean you do not need a dental examination. You should have an annual check of your denture fit, oral tissues, and oral cancer screening. As well as a jaw x-ray every five years to detect growth or changes in the bone.

 

To help keep your mouth healthy and your teeth strong as we age:

Brush. Brushing your teeth can help to remove the thin film of bacteria that builds up on your teeth after eating. So brush at least twice a day with a soft bristle toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste. An electric toothbrush is recommended for seniors as it easier for them to maintain hygiene properly. Our office recommends the Rotadent electric toothbrush. We also recommend the use of a plaque disclosing solution. This allows the patient to see visually if they left any plaque behind and work on ares they are missing.

Floss.Flossing your teeth can help prevent plaque from building up between teeth. Floss at least once a day. We also recommend the use of floss mate. A variety of companies (Butler GUM floss mate or REACH access flosser), make these products and are easily found at the local drug store. These products work well in patients with minimal or reduced dexterity.

Keep up with dentist appointments. If you maintain a regular appointment schedule your dentist can monitor your dental health and make adjustments to your care to avoid serious problems down the road. Routine dental examinations and cleanings are an important part of maintaining good dental health.

If you smoke…QUIT! In addition to increasing your risk of many health conditions, smoking can increase your risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and oral cancer. There are a variety of methods available to quit to make it as painless a possible.

Take care of dentures. If you have dentures, see your dentist regularly (we recommend at least once a year) to make sure they are fitting properly.

Keep your dentures clean by brushing and rinsing them daily and soaking them at night in a denture cleansing liquid.

There are many dental health challenges as we age, but maintaining good oral hygiene and monitoring to your dental health can keep your smile sparkling for many years to come.

Listerine Zero