Family & Cosmetic Care in a Comfortable, Relaxed Environment.

Serving Las Vegas and Henderson, Nevada since 1999.

Dental implants have evolved over time and become an ideal replacement for a lost tooth or teeth. The long term success rate of dental implants is well over 95%. What once was a product offered to very few has now become a mainstream dental care service available to most.

Options For Dental Implants

Depending on each, unique, individual person, each dental implants case will be personalized. Depending on how many teeth are missing as well as the available quantity and quality of bone present. Below are some of the situations where dental implants can replace lost teeth:

-Loss Of A Single Tooth. At one time, this meant wearing a removable appliance (commonly called a “flipper”) or removing natural tooth structure from surrounding teeth to create a fixed bridge of dental crowns. The flipper tends to be uncomfortable to wear and may affect speech. The 3 unit bridge compromises the support teeth by having them do the work of the lost tooth, and by making them more susceptible to decay. The long term success rate is lowered due to difficulties in cleaning under and around the bridge. A single tooth dental implant, when completed properly, will last a lifetime and function just like a natural tooth.

-Loss Of Multiple Teeth. When missing multiple teeth in a single area, dental implants can be used to form a fixed bridge. The beauty of this arrangement is stability and the ability not to affect the natural teeth in any way.

-Replacing All Teeth. In the past, the only way to restore function was to fabricate a removable denture. With dental implants, dentists have the ability to restore natural function and esthetics.

Complementary Procedures To Dental Implants

There are times when other dental procedures are necessary to successfully complete the placement of dental implants. These include:

-Sinus Lift. When you have a large sinus area that impinges on available bone depth, the sinus lift is a common surgical procedure. Sinus lifts are needed to elevate the sinus membrane and thicken a part of the upper jaw with a bone graft. This helps give  a dental implant enough bone depth to place it properly in the area you need it. Dental implants need a good quantity of bone along with good, dense quality of bone to succeed. The upper jaw is known to have poorer quantity and quality bone structure as opposed to the lower jaw. The maxillary sinus also plays a role in increasing difficulty in this area. Sinus augmentation can remedy these issues by raising the sinus floor and placing bone grafts in the area to aid in dental implant placement.

-Bone Grafting. When the bone is not 100% adequate for dental implant placement, dentists are able to add to it by performing a dental bone graft. A bone graft is the placement of bone or bone-like materials in the jaw to to build it up. This gives an excellent platform for dental implants. Modification of the bone in this fashion has been shown to improve both appearance and long term success of dental implants. Typically, dentists try to place implants at least as deeply into bone as the crown or tooth will be above the bone. This is called a 1:1 crown to root ratio. This ratio serves as a guide for bone grafting in most situations.

Can A Dental Implant Fail?

It is quite rare for a dental implant to fail but when it does the dental implant must be removed. Then re evaluated as to why the failure occurred and to see if a new dental implant may be placed. Some of the common reasons for dental implant failure include:

-Failed Integration of Dental Implants - This occurs when the bone does not grow and fuse between the threads of the implant. This fusion of bone to dental implant is called osseointegration. If this does not occur, the dental implants will not function properly,will become uncomfortable, become loose, or come out completely. To reduce this risk, your dental surgeon will evaluate the quality and density of the jaw bone prior to surgery. This will help to only place dental implants in areas where there is a highly predictable success rate. If osseointegration does not take place, the dental implants can be removed, and surgery can be attempted again once the area has fully healed.

-Infection –  This is the most common complication of dental implant surgery. The surrounding bone and gums can get infected during the surgical procedure. This can happen due to non-sterile technique, a contaminated implant, poor healing ability(diabetic, smoker, osteoporosis medications), or pre-existing infection. The most likely time for this to occur would be during the surgical placement of the dental implant into the bone. Implant infection can occur after placement as well. Poor hygiene, too much force placed on the implant, or excess cement can cause the support tissue to breakdown. Implant infection is a condition referred to as peri-implantitis. Peri-implantitis is characterized by inflammation or swelling of the tissues surrounding the implant area. Peri-implantitis can also present as a secondary infection later on is a form of periodontal disease that can lead to inflammation, bone loss and implant failure if not treated quickly and properly. Although implant infections are usually caused by the presence of bacteria during or immediately after the oral surgery for the placement of the dental implants, an implant infection can occur months or years after surgery.

-Post Surgical Bleeding - Some bleeding following surgery is normal and should be expected for about 1-2 days. Biting gently on a gauze pad placed over the surgery area for 30 minutes should normally stop the bleeding. Excessive bleeding is not normal and you should notify your dentist immediately if you have concerns about your dental implants.

-Damage To Surrounding Tissues - Dental implant complications related with surgical errors affecting adjacent teeth, nerves or sinus are directly correlated with the experience and skills of the dentist or surgeon. An experienced and skilled implant dentist is able to identify potential problems by examining x-rays or CT scan (computer tomography), design the proper surgical plan for ideal location and angle, and execute it successfully without complications. Even with the most skilled implant dentist there is always a possibility of dental implant complications. The complications can be limited by choosing an implant dentist with the skills and experience necessary to handle any complications if they arise.

-Rejection – An extremely rare complication for dental implants but it has been noted in the research literature. The dental implants can sometimes be viewed as a foreign body.

-Unusable Dental Implants – An implant that has successfully integrated with bone, but the area or extreme angle of placement deem it unrestorable.

Dental Implants Conclusion

Dental implants have been the solution for many. They come with risks but with proper treatment planning from a well qualified dentist they can be a successful tooth replacement for a lifetime of smiles.

 

 

Choosing the right dentist or doctor is always a difficult thing to do. Some of us rely on friends and family for a referral, while many turn to internet reviews. There are over 150,000 dentists nationally, with new graduates added every year. Many of these dentists are not trained beyond general dental school knowledge to perform more complex dental procedures.

A recent survey revealed that this year about 10% of Americans (and the number grows every year) received at least one cosmetic dental procedure to transform their smiles. Receiving cosmetic dentistry from an experienced, skilled cosmetic dentist can transform your appearance, but poorly executed dentistry can prove to be a disaster.

A sobering statistic, well over 25%, (that is 1 out 4 procedures done) of all the money spent by Americans on cosmetic dentistry is spent re-doing and correcting poor dental work from previous visits.

Things That Can Go Wrong During Cosmetic Dentistry

-Restoration Failure - When any dentistry is done, there can never be decay from cavities left behind. Fillings must be properly shaped and hardened so that they do not cause new problems to arise. Improper technique will not only mean your new fillings,  porcelain veneers or dental crowns will eventually fail, it could also mean the possible need for root canal therapy or even potentially the loss of the tooth if left untreated.

-Pain and Discomfort - A skilled, experienced, dentist knows that  dentistry is about more than just appearances. If you do not plan to address bite issues, periodontal issues, and sensitivity problems, restorations will fail and cause pain and discomfort for the patient. If the bite is off, even slightly, the dental work and tooth will be prone to cracking, wearing, and pain. Root canals can be incomplete and cause reinfection, extractions of teeth can be improperly performed causing severe bone infection, fractures, and pain.

-Lost Time - Cosmetic dentistry is usually lengthy, necessitating multiple visits to the dentist. A typical cosmetic treatment takes at least 2-3 appointments, and can take 1 hour to more than 5-10 hours in the dentist’s chair. The work is an investment of your time and money. If this work is performed poorly and needs to be redone, patients will need to take off more time from work to have it repaired or redone elsewhere.

-Increased Cost - In addition to losing time, the original cost budgeted could explode to fix poor dental work. There is an old saying “You Get What You Pay For”. The same is true in cosmetic and traditional dentistry. It is smart to be cost conscious but many dentists who call themselves cosmetic dentists will offer inferior materials in order to cut costs and lower the price to the consumer. Using a poor dental lab or lower quality materials will cut into the longevity as well as the final appearance of any dental work. When dentistry goes bad, it usually needs to be redone from the beginning. This means losing what you initially invested and paying again for the re-do work.  It is not unusual to have a patient spend money initially only to have to spend a much higher amount to re-do all the work just a short time later.

Conclusion

Choosing a dentist is never an easy decision so do your best to get information from friends, family, and internet. Request a free consultation to tour the office and meet not only the doctor but the staff. Dentistry tends to be an intimate experience and you need to feel confident and comfortable in the dental chair. Choosing the right dentist will make all your dental work a breeze. Most importantly, good dentistry will keep you healthy and end up saving you money in the long run.

For many patients taking a precautionary dosage of antibiotics prior to dental work is considered routine. Those with joint replacement, certain heart diseases, or evenLas Vegas Cosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDS congenital heart defects have been instructed to do so in the past. New findings have caused  The American Heart Association to redefine the guidelines to account for new research information.

American Heart Association Findings

The American Heart Association recommends that only patients who have the greatest risk of a bad outcome from infective endocarditis (IE) should receive short-term preventive antibiotics before routine dental procedures. Infective endocarditis is an infection of the heart’s inner lining or the heart valves, which results when bacteria enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart. This can occur during routine dental procedures like a teeth cleaning.

These new guidelines now remove certain conditions from the list that have been there in the past. The following list shows the conditions that no longer need to be premedicated with antibiotics:

-Mitral valve prolapse

-Rheumatic heart disease

-Bicuspid valve disease

-Calcified aortic stenosis

-Congenital heart conditions such as ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

Antibiotics Risk

These new guidelines are based on scientific evidence that shows the risks from taking preventive antibiotics outweigh the benefits received for most patients. The risks can include allergic reactions to antibiotics, stomach discomfort, yeast infection, or the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

The research also showed that infective endocarditis is far more likely to occur from everyday activities than from any dental procedures. Daily activities like brushing and flossing can expose bacteria from the mouth into the bloodstream just as easily as a dental procedure. The American Heart Association emphasized that patients should maintain good oral hygiene maintenance to reduce the risk of developing infective endocarditis.

Disease Conditions That Still Require Antibiotics

Some condition still require antibiotic premedication and these include:

-Patients with artificial heart valves.

-Previous history of having had infectious endocarditis.

-Presence of a congenital (born with) heart conditions.

-Heart transplant patients who develop issues with a heart valve.

 

Henderson Cosmetic Dentist Marielaina Perrone DDS

The patients with conditions listed above would be at greatest risk of very bad outcomes if they were to develop infectious endocarditis. This is why the American Heart Association recommends antibiotic premedication for these patients. The benefits outweigh the risks for the groups listed above.

Conclusion

Patients should always ask their physician or cardiologist first, to assess their possible need for antibiotic premedication. You should also ask your dentist if you have any questions regarding antibiotic premedication. It is important that this is to be an informed decision between patient and provider, and done on an individual basis. The guidelines are just that, general guidelines, both you and your doctor will decide what is best for you.

Patients also need to be aware that overuse of antibiotics is not a good thing either. Overuse of antibiotics has led to an increase in the number of bacteria now resistant to antibiotics. When this occurs, new antibiotics must be developed to kill these new resistant bacteria. The new resistant bacteria are typically stronger and can cause more serious illnesses.

As always, maintain a good dental hygiene regimen and visit your dentist regularly for dental examinations and professional cleanings.

 

Dental Anxiety - Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or follow up treatment and extreme anxiety over dental procedures.

Let’s face it, not many people truly enjoy going to the dentist. There are plenty who do, but most do not. We know it is good for our dental and overall health, so we go for that reason. For some, an irrational fear takes over, leaving them paralyzed with fear, and without the dental care they need to enjoy their lives fully.  According to a 2009 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) almost 50% of adults skip dental visits due to dental anxiety.

Psychology of Dental Anxiety

Many dental related fears are developed when you are young and impressionable. Sometimes the dental fear is transferred from parents to their children. When a parent is highly anxious, they oftentimes elaborate on pain, needles, drilling, and tooth removal, causing the child to believe that this will happen to them also. For some, a bad dental experience can traumatize them for the future. Feeling pain, gagging, losing control, not knowing what is going on, or having unexpected procedure you were not prepared for can be very difficult to get over. Prior to modern dentistry, dentists and their instruments were given a bad reputation in real life, movies and TV shows . The instruments and techniques used to mask discomfort were less than ideal. In modern dentistry, the dentist is more in tune to patients dental anxiety and dental fears. These dental anxieties can be overcome with a concerted effort by the patient, loved ones, and dentist.

How to Overcome Dental Anxiety

Overcoming dental anxiety can take as little as one visit, or it can take months to years. It all depends on the level of anxiety or phobia a patient might have. The following are some tips to help overcome dental anxiety:

1) Find the “right” dentist. Not all dentists have the same educational training, techniques, or patience when it comes to patients with dental anxiety. Do your research, use the Internet or ask friends and loved ones for recommendations. A good dentist is one, who is able to communicate effectively with you, and put you at ease. Most patients feel better when they know whats going on and how its going to happen. Understanding what will happen in the appointment, and having a signal to stop whenever you need to, gives back control to the patient and takes the surprise out of the situation. You and your dentist will figure out what specific things elevate your dental anxiety, and find ways to work around them. Ask your dentist their policy on emergencies after hours. Many dentists do not return calls after hours while others personally answer calls after hours and even open the office if the situation is necessary.

2) Distraction. Oftentimes, redirecting your mind can set you at ease. Meditation can be taught to you by your dentist. Music can help if the noises of dentistry affect you, bring your ipod or mp3 player with your favorite music and listen during the treatment to distract your mind and relieve your dental anxiety. A soft “squeezy ball” can help, and give that comforting feeling of squeezing someones hand.

3) Take Breaks when Needed. This goes back to communication. Take the time out during procedures to compose yourself as needed. Have a predetermined hand signal to stop the procedure as often as needed. Some patients with dental anxiety feel claustrophobic after awhile and may need to walk around a bit, catch their breath, ask a question, etc. before finishing the dental procedure.

4) Be Open and Honest. Tell your dentist what bothers you most about the dental experience, or past problems that have increased your dental anxiety. For some, the loud pitched noises may be very difficult, for others it might be the smells of the dental office, and for others it might be a past painful experience. These issues can be addressed in order to make your experience more acceptable. In dentistry today, there are many techniques to deliver a more comfortable and comforting experience.

5) Consider Medication. For some of us with more extreme dental anxiety, a mild form of sedation may be necessary to get you through. Taking a medication such as Valium prior to your appointment can help you sleep the night before, and allow for you to actually get to your appointment. Generally, such medications relax your entire body, decreasing the sweats, heart racing, and panic attacks that might otherwise disable you. This is a wonderful way to acclimate yourself to your new dentist, and the dental experience. Over time, the dosage can be reduced as you gain confidence in your dentist and your own coping abilities.  Plenty of patients, with time, can learn the techniques necessary to have dental treatment without medication.

Dental Anxiety Conclusion

Dental anxiety can be truly crippling. What we have to remember is, that if we want good health, dental treatment is necessary.  Recent studies have shown definite links between our dental health and our general health. This means it makes our dental health doubly important for us to lead healthy, happy lives. Dental anxiety CAN be overcome and defeated with a concerted effort by dentist and patient. If you are suffering from dental anxiety, take that first step, and make an appointment to meet with a dentist well versed in treating dental anxiety and dental phobia.