Family & Cosmetic Dental Care in a Relaxed Environment.

Exceptional Dentistry Las Vegas and Henderson NV Since 1999.

Dental Implants, Teeth Whitening, Porcelain Veneers, &
Botox Cosmetic.

Call Today For Consultation!

Email Us
Directions

Being pregnant is an exciting time but it can bring with it lots of anxiety. Anxiety over doing what it is right for you and your baby’s health. This should include dental health as well since there have been direct links between oral health and our overall health. Once you know you are pregnant it is never too early to start thinking about dental health. A baby’s teeth are already beginning to form by about the 5th-6th week following conception. By the time your baby is born all 20 of their baby (primary) teeth are almost completely formed. Below you will find some helpful tips to care for your dental health as well as the baby’s.

What To Expecting When Expecting Your Baby

Does the calcium for my child’s teeth come from my teeth?

No! This is a common myth but it is simply not true. The baby receives all calcium just like their other nutrients from the mother’s dietary intake.

What’s The Best Way To Maintain My Dental Health While Pregnant?

Maintaining dental health during pregnancy is similar to when not pregnant. To prevent tooth decay and periodontal disease it is important to brush your teeth at least 2x per day, floss at least once per day, and use an antibacterial rinse. Pregnancy gingivitis (earliest stage of periodontal disease) can be especially problemsome especially during the 7th-8th month of pregnancy as hormones are raging. Almost one half of women experience pregnancy gingivitis, starting in the 2nd or 3rd month of pregnancy. It generally increases in severity all the way through to the eighth month. This pregnancy gingivitis can be very uncomfortable and cause inflammation, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gums. If you already have poor dental hygiene and periodontal disease before pregnancy begins, expect an extreme progression in your periodontal condition as you end your first trimester and onward. In some women, gums swollen by pregnancy gingivitis can react strongly to irritants and form large growths. These are called pregnancy tumors. These are not cancerous and are usually painless in nature. This tumor may require removal by a dentist if it persists. Research has suggested that pregnant women who have severe periodontal disease may be at a higher risk for preterm birth and low birth weight

Is Fluoride Safe?

For women who take fluoride supplements during pregnancy, it is expected that the added fluoride will help their children form strong teeth. However, this is a controversial subject and has not been fully studied. Additional fluoride will not necessarily aid in the process of enamel formation because fluoride works best when the teeth have fully formed and have erupted in the mouth. Fluoride changes the chemical bonds in the enamel of the erupted teeth to make it more resistant to tooth decay. More research studies are needed to determine the advantages, if any, and the safe dosage levels for prenatal fluoride supplementation.

What About Medications Used In Dental Work During Pregnancy?

Lidocaine is the most commonly used drug for dental work. Lidocaine (category B – No evidence of risk in humans. This category has shown adverse effects in animal trials but in controlled human trials have been deemed to be safe with no increased risk of fetal abnormalities.) is able to cross the placenta after administration. Any local anesthesia can cross the placenta and cause fetal depression, therefore anesthesia dosage should be limited to the minimum required to keep patient comfortable. Luckily, most dentistry can be completed with very small amounts of local anesthetic, thus causing no danger to mom or baby. A major study was completed spanning about 35 years and tracking 55,000 children. The study showed no evidence of any adverse reactions from local anesthetic use in pregnant women.

Dental work often requires antibiotics to prevent or treat infections. Antibiotics such as penicillin, amoxicillin, and clindamycin, which are also labeled category B for safety in pregnancy, may be prescribed after your procedure. The penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics most commonly used in dentistry (penicillin V, amoxicillin, and caphalexin) are generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. Clindamycin, metronidazole, and erythromycin are also believed to have minimal risk. Tetracyclines, including doxycycline, have shown to cause tooth discoloration and impaired bone metabolism. As a side note, taking antibiotics while using birth control medications will generally cause the birth control to be ineffective.

Will My Teeth Be Affected By Morning Sickness?

Vomiting due to morning sickness can lead to erosion of the enamel on the back of your front teeth. However, it is unlikely since the morning sickness lasts for such a short period of time. This is more likely to occur with frequent vomiting over a long period of time. If this is a concern of yours be sure to rinse with water and brush following bouts of morning sickness.

When Is The Best Time To Have Dental Work Performed?

Routine dental maintenance can be performed at any time but during third trimester it might be more difficult to sit in dental chair for long periods of time. The ideal time to see your dentist is during your second trimester, since your baby is more vulnerable during the first and third trimesters, when major development is occurring (first trimester) and the risk of premature delivery increases (late third trimester).

Can I Have My Teeth Whitened While Pregnant?

If you are pregnant, it is suggested to hole off from the use of bleaching agents, this also includes the use of whitening toothpastes. Teeth whitening may be resumed after pregnancy.

Pregnancy Conclusion

One of the best things you can do as an expectant mother is to maintain your own dental and general health.This should include a nutritious diet, regular visits to your physician as well as your dentist. A healthy mom will lead to an easier pregnancy as well as an easier time recovering after birth.

Having a healthy smile does is not as difficult as it may seem. There are simple steps (brush, floss, rinse) that we must repeat on a daily basis. Following these simple steps and some daily care tips can lead to a smile that you can be proud of. Below you will find a few suggestions that can really make a difference in keeping our smiles as healthy as possible.

Easy Dental Care Tips

-Brush, Floss, Rinse Daily. We all know this already, but do we do it properly? These simple tasks are often overlooked in our busy schedules. Brushing at least 2x per day for 2 minutes each time along with flossing at least once per day and rinsing with an antibacterial or fluoride rinse will be a great start to a healthy smile.

-Avoid Sugary Foods And Drinks. Foods high in sugar give the oral bacteria the nutrition it needs to create an acidic environment inside your mouth and can lead to harmful tooth decay.

-Eat Plenty Of Vitamin C. A diet deficient in vitamin C can lead to dental health issues like loose teeth and bleeding gum. Good sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits. Important to note that citrus fruits are highly acidic so you should rinse with water afterwards to neutralize the acids so as not to harm your teeth.

-Eat Lots Of Crunchy Foods. While not a replacement for dental floss, eating hard, crunchy foods (like carrots, celery, and apples) can naturally clean your teeth and freshen your breath.

-Get Your Daily Amount Of Calcium. This will not only keep your teeth strong but also the bones in your body. Good sources of Calcium include milk, soybeans, and cheese. Also, ensure you get enough vitamin D. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium properly. A good source of vitamin D is from the sun. So get outside and exercise!

-Water, Water, Water. Drinking water throughout the day will keep your teeth and body healthy and hydrated. Water is far better for you than any other beverage you can drink.  Rinsing after every meal or snack with water will help maintain your dental health. The water can neutralize the acids being produced by the oral bacteria. This will in turn limit the amount of tooth decay that can occur.

-See Your Dentist Every 6 Months. Seems like an easy one but often neglected. It is important to not only get your teeth professionally cleaned but also to ward off any problems while in their earliest stages.

Conclusion

Following a daily regimen of good oral hygiene, proper diet, and professional cleanings, can help you achieve a healthy smile. Maintaining a winning smile is an important tool for life. Most people notice a person’s smile upon meeting. What do you want your smile to say?

Many people often overlook the need to “feed” our smiles to keep them healthy. Feeding our smiles is just like feeding our bodies. If we eat poorly, our general and dental health will deteriorate over time. Just like our bodies, our teeth need certain essential vitamins and minerals to stay as healthy as possible. Below you will find a few that support good dental health.

Essential Vitamins And Minerals

-Calcium. Almost 100% of the calcium in our bodies is stored in our bones and teeth. Calcium provides structural support for our bones and teeth. A reduction in calcium can lead to periodontal disease and tooth decay (as well as possibly osteoporosis over time). Good sources of calcium include milk, yogurt, cheese, and kale

-Iron. Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies. Low iron can lead to an inflamed tongue (glossitis), bald or cracked tongue, development of mouth sores, and cracked teeth due to an incredible urge to chew ice. Good sources of iron include red meat and Liver.

-Vitamin A. Helps maintain good salivary flow. Saliva is important to wash away oral bacteria and excess food particles along the gumline and between the teeth. Good sources include sweet potatoes, melons, and spinach.

-Vitamin B3 (Niacin). Vitamin B3 helps your body convert food into energy and helps your nervous system function properly. This essential nutrient can lead to excessively bad breath and canker sores in the mouth. Good sources include chicken and fish.

-Vitamin B12 and B2 (Riboflavin). Consuming Vitamin B12 and B2 can reduce your risk of developing canker sores. Good sources of vitamin B2 include red meat, chicken, liver, pork, yogurt, and cheese. Good sources of vitamin B12 include pasta, spinach, and almonds.

-Vitamin C: This vitamin is not only helpful for your immune system, but it also plays a crucial role in protecting your gum tissue from developing gingivitis. Good sources of vitamin C include red peppers and oranges.

-Vitamin D: This vitamin is one of the most important vitamins for your oral health. It’s the vitamin that supports the absorption of calcium. A deficiency of vitamin D, can lead to the development of “burning mouth” syndrome. This syndrome causes a burning sensation in the mouth along with the possibility of dry mouth and a change in taste (metallic taste). Good sources of Vitamin D include milk with egg yolk or fish to increase Vitamin D intake

Vitamins And Minerals Conclusion

Maintaining a diet rich in vitamins and minerals is a great first step to supporting your oral health at any age. Diet is often overlooked in its role in maintaining dental health but it is very important to create a good foundation for good dental health. Better to be proactive then reactive when it comes to our health.

Calcium is an important building block in our diets. The proper amount of calcium results in strong, healthy bones as well as strong teeth. Vitamin D plays a supportive role, and should be understood for it’s important role in helping the body absorb the incoming calcium. Many parents want to know if their child is receiving enough calcium to keep healthy and develop properly. This is especially true for those children who do not like to drink milk (8 ounces contains about 300 mg of calcium).

Guidelines For Calcium Intake

This amount needed varies by the age of the child:

-1 to 3 years old — 700 milligrams daily

-4 to 8 years old — 1000 milligrams

-9 to 18 years old — 1,300 milligrams

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, only one in five children meets even the minimum standards for calcium intake. But most kids ages 9 to 18 do not get the recommended 1,300 milligrams of calcium per day.

Foods To Ingest For Calcium (Besides Milk)

Sometimes a refusal to drink milk is just a matter of taste. A good option is to try to use flavored milks, such as chocolate or strawberry milk (which has less sugar than juice or soda), and drinkable yogurt, which is loaded with calcium. Another good way to make milk taste better are by making milkshakes or healthy smoothies.

-Yogurt (8 ounces contains about 400 mg of calcium)

-Cheese (Think grilled cheese sandwiches, pizza, or lasagna)

-Custard

-Rice Pudding

-Calcium-fortified orange juice

-Calcium-fortified soy milk

-Calcium-fortified breads and cereals

-Beans

-Broccoli

-Spinach

-Tofu

If your child is allergic to milk or is lactose intolerant, you may not be able to use many of the above suggestions to help increase their calcium intake. Luckily, there are many products and supplements available to provide the necessary calcium that your child requires.

Conclusion

Calcium is an essential part of a healthy diet for children and adults. The importance of the proper amounts of calcium found in our nutrition is vital to the proper development of a child. Without proper intake of calcium, growth can be stunted, teeth and bones may not be as strong. There are many options available to provide your child with the right amount of calcium. Find what works best for you and your family!